Victoria

September 2, 2015 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
Latin, from the Roman goddess of victory; feminine form of “Victorius” (which is also, of course, from Latin, meaning “victory”).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Latoya, Toree, Tori, Toria, Toriana, Torie, Torri, Torrie, Torry, Tory, Toya, Vic, Vicie, Vickey, Vicki, Vickie, Vicky, Victoire, Victoriana, Victorina, Victorine, Victory, Vicy, Vikki, Viktoria, Viktorie, Viktorija, Viktoriya, Vitoria, Vittoria, Wikolia, Wiktoria, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Aunt Victoria, Shad’s aunt in Washington, who works as a nurse during the war, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Victoria Benedictsson (1850-1888), Swedish novelist who published under the pen name “Ernst Ahlgren”.
Victoria Mary Clarke (b. 1966), Irish journalist and writer.
Victoria Chang (b. 1970), American poet and writer.
Victoria Hislop (b. 1959), English novelist and short story writer.
Victoria Newcomb (b. 1974), American novelist.
Victoria Ocampo (1890-1979), Argentine intellectual and writer.
Victoria Strauss (b. 1955), American fantasy author.
Victoria Williams (b. 1958), American musician, singer, and songwriter.

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Lucinda

September 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
A variation of “Lucia” / “Lucy“, created by Miguel de Cervantes for his 1605 novel Don Quixote.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cinda, Cinde, Cindi, Cindie, Cindy, Sinda, Sinde, Sindi, Sindie, Sindy, Liucija, Liusaidh, Lleucu, Llucia, Luca, Luce, Lucette, Luci, Lucia, Lucie, Lucija, Lucila, Lucilla, Lucile, Lucille, Lucilla, Lucinde, Lucja, Lucy, Lula, Lulu, Lusinda, Lusinde, Lusia, Lusi, Lusie, Lusy, Luus, Luzia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lucinda Creighton (b. 1834), one of “the twin girls, long since married and moved to Ohio” who are among Jethro’s far-distant older siblings, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Lucinda Coxon (b. 1962), English playwright and screenwriter.
Lucinda Lambton (b. 1943), English broadcaster, photographer, and writer.
Lucinda Rosenfeld (b. 1969), American novelist.
Lucinda Roy (b. 1955), English educator, novelist, and poet.

Nina

August 4, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Usually, a diminutive of names ending in “-nina”, such as “Antonina” or “Giannina”, or a variation of “Ann” / “Anne“. Possibly referring to the Spanish word, meaning “little girl”; or from the Native American (Quechua) word, meaning “fire”; or the Russian feminine version of “Nino”; or to the name of a Babylonian and Assyrian fertility goddess.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ani, Ann, Anne, Anni, Annie, Anny, Antonina, Giannina, Nainsi, Nan, Nana, Nance, Nanci, Nancie, Nancy, Nandag, Nanette, Nanice, Nanine, Nannie, Nanny, Nanse, Nansi, Nansie, Nansy, Neena, Neenah, Nena, Nenci, Nensi, Neske, Nest, Nesta, Nina, Ninette, Ninon, Nona, Nonna, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Nina Leffer, the sophisticated girl who becomes Lily’s first new friend after moving to a new neighborhood and a new school, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

Berta

August 2, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Variation of “Bertha“; or a diminutive form of names like “Alberta”, “Roberta“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Alberta, Albertina, Albertine, Auberta, Berchta, Berdi, Berdie, Berdy, Berdina, Berhta, Berit, Bert, Bertha, Berthe, Berti, Bertie, Bertille, Bertina, Berty, Birdi, Birdie, Birdy, Burti, Burtie, Burty, Elberta, Elberte, Elbertina, Elbertine, Elbertyna, Hrothbeorhta, Hrothberta, Hrothbertina, Hrothnerta, Perda, Perde, Perdi, Perdie, Perdy, Pirda, Pirde, Pirdi, Pirdie, Pirdy, Purda, Purde, Purdi, Purdie, Purdy, Perchta, Perta, Perte, Perti, Pertie, Perty, Pirta, Pirte, Pirti, Pirtie, Pirty, Purta, Purte, Purti, Purtie, Purty, Roberta, Robertia, Robertina, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Great Aunt Berta, Lily’s elderly relative and Becky’s sister, who is aware their nephew died of heart failure months ago, but has kept the news from her sister, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

WRITERS:
Berta Behrens (1850-1912), German novelist who published under the pen name “Wilhelmine (W.) Heimburg”.
Berta Bojetu Boeta (1946-1997), Slovene actress, poet, and writer.
Berta Golob (b. 1932), Slovene librarian, poet, teacher, and writer.
Berta Hader (1890-1976), American children’s book author and illustrator.
Berta Ruck (1878-1978), British memoirist and novelist.
Berta Zuckerkandl (1864-1935), Austrian critic, journalist, and writer.

Roberta

July 18, 2015 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
Feminine form of “Robert“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Berti, Bertie, Berty, Bobbi, Bobbie, Bobby, Robertia, Robertina, Robin, Robina, Robyn, Robynne, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Roberta Zolotow, Susan’s new best friend at Camp Ava, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

WRITERS:
Roberta Flack (b. 1937/39), American musician and singer-songwriter.
Roberta Beach Jacobson (b. 1952), American editor, humorist, and journalist.
Roberta Kalechofsky (b. 1931), American activist and writer.
Roberta Lannes (b. 1948), American author, essayist, poet, and writer.
Roberta Rogow (b. 1942), American author and librarian.
Roberta Spear (1948-2003), American poet.
Roberta Teale Swartz (1903-1993), American academic, poet, and professor.
Roberta (Mary Morgan) Wohlstetter (1912-2007), American historian.

Inez

May 24, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Anglicization of “Inés”, the Italian or Spanish version of “Agnes“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Annice, Annis, Aune, Iines, Ines, Nainsi, Nance, Nancie, Nancy, Nensi, Nes, Neske, Nessie, Nessy, Nest, Nesta, Neysa, Oanez, Ynes, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Inez Carew, the actress Carrie replaces for her first big break, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).

WRITERS:
Inez Baskin (1916-2007), American activist and journalist.
Inez Hogan (1895-1973), American children’s book author and illustrator.
Inez Holden (1903-1974), English journalist, socialite, and writer.
Inez Haynes Irwin (1873-1970), American activist, author, and journalist who sometimes published as “Inez Haynes Gillmore”.

Lola

May 24, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Dolores”, meaning “sorrowful”. May also be used (in a roundabout sort of way) as a diminutive of “Dorothy” or “Mary“, through the “Doll” / “Moll” / “Poll” / “Loll” rhyming tradition.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Loleta, Lolette, Lolicia, Lolita, Loll, Lollie, Lolly

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lola Osborne, Carrie’s friend and fellow actress, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).

WRITERS:
Lola Anglada (1893-1984), Spanish illustrator and writer.
Lola Ridge (1873-1941), Irish-American anarchist, editor, and poet.
Lola Rodríguez de Tió (1843-1924), Puerto Rican activist and poet.
Lola Lemire Tostevin (b. 1937), French Canadian poet, novelist, and translator.

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