Lola

May 24, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Dolores”, meaning “sorrowful”. May also be used (in a roundabout sort of way) as a diminutive of “Dorothy” or “Mary“, through the “Doll” / “Moll” / “Poll” / “Loll” rhyming tradition.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Loleta, Lolette, Lolicia, Lolita, Loll, Lollie, Lolly

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lola Osborne, Carrie’s friend and fellow actress, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).

WRITERS:
Lola Anglada (1893-1984), Spanish illustrator and writer.
Lola Ridge (1873-1941), Irish-American anarchist, editor, and poet.
Lola Rodríguez de Tió (1843-1924), Puerto Rican activist and poet.
Lola Lemire Tostevin (b. 1937), French Canadian poet, novelist, and translator.

Norman

May 12, 2015 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
An old Germanic name meaning “Northman”, referring to the Vikings who settled Normandy.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Norm, Normand, Normant, Normie

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Dr. Norman McNeill Hale, a well-known figure in Chicago, who buys one of the boxes for the play Drouet’s Elks lodge puts on as a fundraiser, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).

WRITERS:
Norman Bridwell (1928-2014), American children’s book writer and cartoonist.
Norman Corwin (1910-2011), American essayist, producer, professor, screenwriter, and writer.
Norman Cousins (1915-1990), American activist, author, editor, journalist, and professor.
Norman Davies (b. 1939), Anglo-Polish historian and writer.
Norman Douglas (1868-1952), Scottish-Austrian author and travel writer.
Norman Finkelstein (b. 1953), American activist, author, professor, and scholar.
Norman Finkelstein (b. 1954), American critic and poet.
Norman Rowland Gale (1862-1942), English poet, reviewer, and story-teller.
Norman Hunter (1899-1995), English children’s book writer.
Norman Lear (b. 1922), American activist, producer, and screenwriter.
Norman Lewis (1908-2003), English author and journalist.
Norman Lewis (1912-2006), American author, etymologist, grammarian, and lexicographer.
Norman Lindsay (1879-1969), Australian artist, author, cartoonist, and writer.
Norman Maclean (1902-1990), American author and scholar.
Norman Mailer (1923-2007), American activist, actor, essayist, filmmaker, journalist, novelist, and playwright.
Norman Whitfield (1940-2008), American producer and songwriter.

Sven

May 10, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From the Old Norse “Sveinn”, meaning “boy”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Soini, Svein, Sveinn, Svend, Svens

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Sven Hanson, Carrie’s solemn and austere brother-in-law in Chicago, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).

WRITERS:
Sven Agessen (b. 1140-50-death unknown), Danish historian and writer.
Sven Delblanc (1931-1992), Swedish academic, author, professor, and translator.
Sven G. Eliassen (b. 1944), Norwegian historian.
Sven Elvestad (1884-1934), Norwegian author and journalist, who published mystery stories under the pen name “Stein Riverton”.
Sven Hassel (or Hazel; 1917-2012), pen name of Danish novelist Børge Willy Redsted Pedersen.
Sven Hedin (1865-1962), Swedish explorer, geographer, illustrator, photographer, topographer, and travel writer.
Sven Lidman (1882-1960), Swedish dramatist, novelist, poet, and preacher.
Sven Lidman (1921-2011), Swedish lexicographer and writer.
Sven Lindqvist (b. 1932), Swedish author and historian.
Sven Methling, Jr. (1918-2005), Danish director and screenwriter.
Sven Moren (1871-1938), Norwegian activist, author, children’s book writer, farmer, playwright, poet, and politician.
Sven Rosén (1708-1750), Swedish theologian and writer.
Sven Stolpe (1905-1996), Swedish critic, journalist, scholar, translator, and writer.

Oliver

December 3, 2014 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
Variation of the French “Olivier”; either from German, meaning “elven army”, or from Latin, meaning “olive tree”, or from the Nordic “Olaf”, meaning “ancestor’s descendant”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Oli, Olivier, Oliviero, Ollie, Noll, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Oliver Landry, Thea’s accompanist, and friend to both Thea and Fred, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).

WRITERS:
– Oliver Crawford (1917-2008), American author and screenwriter.
– Oliver Goldsmith (1728-1774), Anglo-Irish novelist, playwright, and poet.
– Oliver Herford (1863-1935), American artist, humorist, illustrator, and writer.
– Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809-1894), American author, lecturer, physician, poet, and professor.
– Oliver Lodge (1851-1940), English physicist and writer.
– Oliver W.F. Lodge (1878-1955), English author and poet.
– Oliver Onions (1873-1961), English writer.
– Oliver Sacks (b. 1933), Anglo-American author and neurologist.

Otto

December 3, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Variation of the Germanic “Audo” or “Odo”, meaning “wealth”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Audo, Eudes, Oddo, Ode, Odi, Odilon, Odo, Otello, Otho, Othello, Ottone, Ottorino, Rino, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Otto Ottenburg, Fred’s brewing magnate father, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).

WRITERS:
– Otto Julius Bierbaum (1865-1910), German writer.
– Otto Binder (1911-1974), American author and comic book writer.
– Otto Ludwig (1813-1865), German critic, dramatist, and novelist.
– Otto Manninen (1872-1950), Finnish poet, translator, and writer.
– Otto Rank (1884-1939), Austrian educator, psychoanalyst, and writer.
– Otto Scott (1918-2006), American author, biographer, and journalist.
– Otto Steiger (1909-2005), Swiss broadcaster and writer.

Miles

November 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Either from the Germanic “Milo”, possibly meaning “gracious” or “merciful”, or referencing the Latin word for “soldier”, or a variation of “Michael“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Milo, Myles.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Miles Murdston, a professional singer who hires Thea as a rehearsal accompanist in Chicago, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).

WRITERS:
– Miles Clark (1960-1993), Irish journalist, sailor, and writer.
– Miles Franklin (1879-1954), pen name of Australian activist and writer Stella Miles Franklin.
– Miles J. Stanford (1914-1999), American minister and writer.

Hiram

November 24, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “exalted brother”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hi, High, Hirem, Huram, Hurem, Hy, Hyram, Hyrem.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Hiram Bowers, Madison Bowers’ father, a Boston choirmaster, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).

WRITERS:
– Hiram M. Chittenden (1858-1917), American historian.
– Hiram Alfred (H.A.) Cody (1872-1948), Canadian clergyman and novelist.
– Hiram Fuller (1814-1880), American educator and journalist.

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