Lucinda

September 1, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
A variation of “Lucia” / “Lucy“, created by Miguel de Cervantes for his 1605 novel Don Quixote.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cinda, Cinde, Cindi, Cindie, Cindy, Sinda, Sinde, Sindi, Sindie, Sindy, Liucija, Liusaidh, Lleucu, Llucia, Luca, Luce, Lucette, Luci, Lucia, Lucie, Lucija, Lucila, Lucilla, Lucile, Lucille, Lucilla, Lucinde, Lucja, Lucy, Lula, Lulu, Lusinda, Lusinde, Lusia, Lusi, Lusie, Lusy, Luus, Luzia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lucinda Creighton (b. 1834), one of “the twin girls, long since married and moved to Ohio” who are among Jethro’s far-distant older siblings, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Lucinda Coxon (b. 1962), English playwright and screenwriter.
Lucinda Lambton (b. 1943), English broadcaster, photographer, and writer.
Lucinda Rosenfeld (b. 1969), American novelist.
Lucinda Roy (b. 1955), English educator, novelist, and poet.

Advertisements

Nan

June 9, 2015 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Ann” / “Anne“, or shortened version of “Nancy“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ann, Anne, Annie, Anny, Nainsi, Nancie, Nancy, Nana, Nance, Nandag, Nanette, Nanice, Nanine, Nannie, Nanny, Nanse, Nansi, Nansie, Nansy, Nenci, Nensi, Neske, Nest, Nesta, Nina, Ninette, Ninon, Nona, Nonna, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Nan Duval, Diana’s younger sister, who lost an eye in a dart accident, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

QUOTATIONS:
– From The Merry Wives of Windsor (1602), Act IV scene 4, by William Shakespeare: “My Nan shall be the Queen of all the fairies, / Finely attired in a robe of white.”

WRITERS:
Nan Agle (1905-2006), American children’s book writer.
Nan Chauncy (1900-1970), Anglo-Australian children’s book writer.
Nan Cohen (b. 1968), American poet.
Nan Fairbrother (1913-1971), English lecturer and writer.
Nan McDonald (1921-1974), Australian editor and poet.
Nan C. Robertson (1926-2009), American author, educator, and journalist.
Nan (Anna) Shepherd (1893-1981), Scottish novelist and poet.
Nan Bentzen Skille (b. 1945), Norwegian biographer and editor.

Jeremiah

September 14, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “God has raised high”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hieremias, Ieremias, Jarmo, Jer, Jere, Jeremias, Jeremie, Jeremy, Jerrie, Jerry, Jorma, Reme, Remy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Nickname for Jeremy Stickles (sometimes called “Jerry” as well), the Court Messenger who, after being sent to bring John Ridd back to London, befriends the Ridd family and aids in the fight against the Doones, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

WRITERS:
– Jeremiah Burrows (c. 1600-1646), English preacher and religious writer.
– Jeremiah Curtin (1835-1906), American folklorist and translator.

Annamaria

September 2, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Combination of “Anna” and “Maria“; variation of “Annemarie”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Anna Maria, Anna Marie, Anne Marie, Annamarie, Annemarie, Marian, Marianne, Maryann, Maryanna, Maryanne, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Annamaria, one of Sir John and Lady Middleton’s children, in Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility (set between 1792-1797, published in 1811).

WRITERS:
– Anna Maria Bennett (c. 1750-1808), English novelist (sometimes credited as “Agnes Maria Hall”)
– Anna Maria Bunn (1808-1889), Australian author.
– Anna Maria Falconbridge (1769-c. 1816), English writer.
– Anna Maria Hall (1800-1881), Irish novelist (sometimes credited as “Mrs. S.C. Hall”)
– Anna Maria Hussey (1805-1853), English scientist, writer, and illustrator.
– Anna Maria Lenngren (1754-1817), Swedish poet, translator, and writer.
– Anna Maria Ortese (1914-1998), Italian poet and short story writer.
– Anna Maria Porter (1780-1832), English poet and novelist.
– Anna Maria Rückerschöld (1725-1805), Swedish author.
– Anna Maria van Schurman (1607-1678), German-Dutch engraver, painter, poet, and scholar.
– Anna Maria Wells (c. 1794-1868), American poet and children’s book writer.

Dagonet

August 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Possibly from the Old English “daeg”, meaning “day”, or related to “dagon”, meaning “big fish”, or to “dague”, meaning “dagger”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Daegan, Dagan, Dagen, Dagget, Dagnet, Dagney, Dagon, Daguenet.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Sir Dagonet Balfour, of Balfour Hall, who wishes to make Keren Lemon a lady, in “The Farrier Lass o’ Piping Pebworth” (written in 1887, set circa 1600), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales (1888), by Amélie Rives.

Marjory

August 22, 2014 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Margery” / “Marjorie”, a medieval English version of “Margaret“, influenced by the name of the herb “marjoram”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Madge, Mae, Maisie, Maisy, Mame, Mamie, Margaret, Margareta, Margaretha, Margarethe, Margarita, Margaux, Marge, Margery, Margie, Margit, Margy, Margo, Margot, Marguerite, Marji, Marjorie, May, Mayme, Maymie, Meg, Megan, Megeen, Megen, Meggie, Meggy, Meta, Metta, Midge, Mim, Mimi, Mimsie, Mimsy, Mysie, Jorey, Jori, Jorie, Peg, Pegeen, Peggie, Peggy, Peigi, Reeta, Rita, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Marjory, a village woman who loses her reason after her man falls from a cliff, in “Nurse Crumpet Tells the Story” (written in 1887, set circa 1630s-1669), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales (1888), by Amélie Rives.
Marjory Pebble, a little girl who lives near the Lemons, in “The Farrier Lass o’ Piping Pebworth” (written in 1887, set circa 1600), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales.

WRITERS:
– Marjory Stoneman Douglas (1890-1998), American activist, journalist, and writer.
– Marjory Wardrop (1869-1909), English scholar and translator.

Joel

August 22, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “Jehovah is God”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Jo, Joe, Joey, Ioel, Yoel.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Joel, the bartender at the Red Deer, in “The Farrier Lass o’ Piping Pebworth” (written in 1887, set circa 1600), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales (1888), by Amélie Rives.

WRITERS:
– Joel Chandler Harris (1845-1908), American author, folklorist, and journalist.
– Joel Rosenberg (1954-2011), Canadian-American activist and author.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with 1600s at The Art of Literary Nomenclature.