Irv

August 31, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Shortened version of “Irving”, from a Scottish last name / place name, meaning “beautiful” or “green water”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Earwin, Earvin, Erwin, Erwyn, Erv, Ervin, Ervyn, Irwin, Irwyn, Irven, Irvine, Irving, Irvyn, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Irv Chandler, a friend from Hildalgo, who joins in the watch over the Creighton farm when it’s threatened by Guy Wortman and his gang, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

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Sigurd

August 31, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Old Norse, meaning “victorious guardian”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Siguror, Sigurour, Sigvard, Sjurd, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Sigurd Nelson, a neighbor from “our toward Old Grandville”, who joins in the watch over the Creighton farm when it’s threatened by Guy Wortman and his gang, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Sigurd Abel (1837-1873), German historian.
Sigurd Bødtker (1866-1928), Norwegian critic and poet.
Sigurd Christiansen (1891-1947), Norwegian novelist and playwright.
Sigurd Engelstad (1914-2006), Norwegian archivist, genealogist, and writer.
Sigurd Evensmo (1912-1978), Norwegian author and journalist.
Sigurd Hoel (1890-1960), Norwegian author, editor, and consultant.
Sigurd Ibsen (1859-1930), Norwegian author, lawyer, and statesman.
Sigurd Lybeck (1895-1975), Norwegian farmer, novelist, and short story writer.
Sigurd Segelcke Meidell (1878-1968), Norwegian genealogist, journalist, and novelist.
Sigurd Nergaard (1873-1932), Norwegian educator, folklorist, and writer.
Sigurd F. Olson (1899-1982), American activist and author.
Sigurd Risting (1870-1935), Norwegian historian, teacher, and writer.
Sigurd Senje (1919-1993), Norwegian author, children’s book writer, historian, and novelist.
Sigurd Swane (1879-1973), Danish painter and poet.
Sigurd Willoch (1903-1991), Norwegian art director and historian.

Israel

August 31, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “ruling with the Lord” or “wrestling with the Lord” (from “Yisra’el”, meaning “God contended”).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Is, Iser, Israhel, Isreal, Isreel, Issur, Issy, Iz, Izrael, Izreel, Izzy, Sroel, Yisrael, Yizreel, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Israel Thomas, a friend and neighbor of the Creighton’s, who sometimes brings their mail over from Hidalgo, and who joins in the watch over the Creighton farm when it’s threatened by Guy Wortman and his gang, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Israel the Grammarian (c.895-c.965), Breton (?) philosopher, poet, scholar, theologian, and writer.
Israel Belkind (1861-1929), Russian activist, author, educator, historian, and writer.
Israel Davidson (1870-1939), American publisher and writer.
Israel Friedlander (1876-1920), Polish activist, educator, rabbi, scholar, and translator.
Israel Dov Frumkin (1850-1914), Russian-Palestinian author and journalist.
Israel Gollancz (1863-1930), English editor, professor, scholar, and translator.
Israel Gutman (1923-2013), Polish-Israeli historian.
Israel Horovitz (b. 1939), American actor, director, and playwright.
Israel ben Moses Najara (c.1555-c.1625), Ottoman poet, preacher, and rabbi.
Israel Orenstein (1831-after 1888?), Russian novelist.
Israel Pinkas (b. 1935), Israeli poet.
Israel Regardie (1907-1985), Anglo-American occultist and writer.
Israel Segal (1944-2007), Israeli author, commentator, and journalist.
Israel Joshua Singer (1893-1944), American novelist.
Israel Zangwill (1864-1926), English activist and author.

Guy

August 31, 2015 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
French (pronounced “gee”), meaning “guide”, or Germanic, meaning “wood”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Guide, Guido, Gvidas, Veit, Vid, Vida, Vit, Wide, Wido, Wit, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Guy Wortman, the cowardly local who bullies the Creighton family in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Guy de Maupassant (1850-1893), French novelist, poet, and short story writer.

Everything Old is New Again, Vol. III

August 30, 2015 § Leave a comment

Once again, we delve into the world of classic baby names rarin’ to come roaring back! (Here are the first and second installments; it’s interesting to see where these sorts of articles overlap and where they diverge, no?)

As always, click through for more info:

Names included are:

For girls: Alba, Alma, Anastasia, Annie, Beatrice, Clara, Cora, Dorothy, Felicity, Florence, Frances, Gemma, Hattie, Hazel, Helen, Hilda, Ingrid, June, Leona, Lola, Lucy, Mabel, Mae, Margaret, Margot, Marjorie, Maude, Mercy, Millie, Olive, Pearl, Penny, Rosemary, Rosie, Ruby, Ruth / Ruthie, Sadie, Selma, Thelma, Veda, Vera, and Winifred.

For boys: Albert, Amos, Arthur, August, Augustine, Calvin, Cassius, Charlie, Clarence, Clyde, Enoch, Ephraim, Everett, Felix, Finn, Florin, Francis, Frank, Franklin, Frederick, George, Gilbert, Hank, Harry, Harvey, Henry, Jasper, Julian, Lionel, Oliver, Otto, Owen, Ralph, Reuben, Roland, Samson, Silas, Thaddeus, Theo / Theodore, Truman, Uriah, and Walter.

The State of Pop-Culture Naming, 2015

August 30, 2015 § 1 Comment

People have no doubt been naming their children after pop-culture trends since there’s been anything to consider culture — from saints to royalty to favorite characters. Modern-day pop-culture names reflect some of our most-loved films and television shows (or, for purists, the books they may have been based on). Let’s take a look at some of them, shall we?

Some of the pop-culture names and sources mentioned are:

For girls: Amelia (possibly inspired at least in part by Doctor Who); Arya, Daenerys, Khaleesi, Maisie (after one of the actresses) and Sansa (from the A Song of Ice and FireGame of Thrones series); Cora, Edith, Rose, and Violet (from Downton Abbey); Elsa (from Frozen); Hazel (from the popular YA book The Fault in Our Stars); Katniss (from The Hunger Games series); Luna (from the Harry Potter series); Natasha (from The Avengers movies); Piper (from Orange is the New Black).

For boys: Anakin (from the Star Wars franchise); Archer (from the animated series Archer); Benedict (after the star of Sherlock); Emmet (from The Lego Movie); George (the royal family still influencing popular trends!); Gus (from the popular YA book The Fault in Our Stars); Jesse (from Breaking Bad); Kristoff and Olaf (from Frozen); Loki (from The Avengers movies); Theon and Tyrion (from the A Song of Ice and FireGame of Thrones series).

Red

August 27, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the English word, meaning, well, “red”; usually used as a nickname for someone with red hair or a ruddy complexion.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
That’s, um, pretty much it.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Red (Ross) Milton, “the red-haired editor of the county newspaper”, who takes Jethro under his wing, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

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