Lavinia

September 17, 2015 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Unknown; possibly Etruscan; the name of Aeneas’ wife in The Aeneid.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Lavina, Lavena, Viney, Vinie, Vinnie, Vinny.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lavinia Lyte (called “Vinny“), Johnny’s proud and determined mother (and Merchant Lyte’s niece), once the “wildest and handsomest girl in Boston”, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).
Lavinia Lyte, Merchant Lyte’s daughter, a beautiful, spoiled, jaded, rich girl who gets what she wants no matter who suffers by it, in Johnny Tremain.

WRITERS:
Lavinia R. Davis (1909-1961), American children’s book author and novelist, who also published under the pen name “Wendell Farmer”.
Lavinia Derwent (1909-1989), pen name of Scottish author and broadcaster Elizabeth Dodd.
Lavinia Dock (1858-1956), American activist, author, and nurse.
Lavinia Greenlaw (b. 1962), English novelist and poet.

QUOTATIONS:
– From Titus Andronicus (c. 1594), Act II, scene 1, by William Shakespeare: “She is a woman, therefore may be woo’d; / She is a woman, therefore may be won; / She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.”

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Victoria

September 2, 2015 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
Latin, from the Roman goddess of victory; feminine form of “Victorius” (which is also, of course, from Latin, meaning “victory”).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Latoya, Toree, Tori, Toria, Toriana, Torie, Torri, Torrie, Torry, Tory, Toya, Vic, Vicie, Vickey, Vicki, Vickie, Vicky, Victoire, Victoriana, Victorina, Victorine, Victory, Vicy, Vikki, Viktoria, Viktorie, Viktorija, Viktoriya, Vitoria, Vittoria, Wikolia, Wiktoria, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Aunt Victoria, Shad’s aunt in Washington, who works as a nurse during the war, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Victoria Benedictsson (1850-1888), Swedish novelist who published under the pen name “Ernst Ahlgren”.
Victoria Mary Clarke (b. 1966), Irish journalist and writer.
Victoria Chang (b. 1970), American poet and writer.
Victoria Hislop (b. 1959), English novelist and short story writer.
Victoria Newcomb (b. 1974), American novelist.
Victoria Ocampo (1890-1979), Argentine intellectual and writer.
Victoria Strauss (b. 1955), American fantasy author.
Victoria Williams (b. 1958), American musician, singer, and songwriter.

Sigurd

August 31, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Old Norse, meaning “victorious guardian”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Siguror, Sigurour, Sigvard, Sjurd, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Sigurd Nelson, a neighbor from “our toward Old Grandville”, who joins in the watch over the Creighton farm when it’s threatened by Guy Wortman and his gang, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Sigurd Abel (1837-1873), German historian.
Sigurd Bødtker (1866-1928), Norwegian critic and poet.
Sigurd Christiansen (1891-1947), Norwegian novelist and playwright.
Sigurd Engelstad (1914-2006), Norwegian archivist, genealogist, and writer.
Sigurd Evensmo (1912-1978), Norwegian author and journalist.
Sigurd Hoel (1890-1960), Norwegian author, editor, and consultant.
Sigurd Ibsen (1859-1930), Norwegian author, lawyer, and statesman.
Sigurd Lybeck (1895-1975), Norwegian farmer, novelist, and short story writer.
Sigurd Segelcke Meidell (1878-1968), Norwegian genealogist, journalist, and novelist.
Sigurd Nergaard (1873-1932), Norwegian educator, folklorist, and writer.
Sigurd F. Olson (1899-1982), American activist and author.
Sigurd Risting (1870-1935), Norwegian historian, teacher, and writer.
Sigurd Senje (1919-1993), Norwegian author, children’s book writer, historian, and novelist.
Sigurd Swane (1879-1973), Danish painter and poet.
Sigurd Willoch (1903-1991), Norwegian art director and historian.

Israel

August 31, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “ruling with the Lord” or “wrestling with the Lord” (from “Yisra’el”, meaning “God contended”).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Is, Iser, Israhel, Isreal, Isreel, Issur, Issy, Iz, Izrael, Izreel, Izzy, Sroel, Yisrael, Yizreel, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Israel Thomas, a friend and neighbor of the Creighton’s, who sometimes brings their mail over from Hidalgo, and who joins in the watch over the Creighton farm when it’s threatened by Guy Wortman and his gang, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Israel the Grammarian (c.895-c.965), Breton (?) philosopher, poet, scholar, theologian, and writer.
Israel Belkind (1861-1929), Russian activist, author, educator, historian, and writer.
Israel Davidson (1870-1939), American publisher and writer.
Israel Friedlander (1876-1920), Polish activist, educator, rabbi, scholar, and translator.
Israel Dov Frumkin (1850-1914), Russian-Palestinian author and journalist.
Israel Gollancz (1863-1930), English editor, professor, scholar, and translator.
Israel Gutman (1923-2013), Polish-Israeli historian.
Israel Horovitz (b. 1939), American actor, director, and playwright.
Israel ben Moses Najara (c.1555-c.1625), Ottoman poet, preacher, and rabbi.
Israel Orenstein (1831-after 1888?), Russian novelist.
Israel Pinkas (b. 1935), Israeli poet.
Israel Regardie (1907-1985), Anglo-American occultist and writer.
Israel Segal (1944-2007), Israeli author, commentator, and journalist.
Israel Joshua Singer (1893-1944), American novelist.
Israel Zangwill (1864-1926), English activist and author.

Guy

August 31, 2015 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
French (pronounced “gee”), meaning “guide”, or Germanic, meaning “wood”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Guide, Guido, Gvidas, Veit, Vid, Vida, Vit, Wide, Wido, Wit, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Guy Wortman, the cowardly local who bullies the Creighton family in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Guy de Maupassant (1850-1893), French novelist, poet, and short story writer.

Colvin

August 27, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Perhaps from the Old Welsh name “Coluin”, meaning unknown; or from an old English and Scottish last name, derived from a French place name; or from the Irish “Mac Conluain”, meaning “son of the great hero”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Colleville, Colewin, Coluin, Colville, Colvine, Colvinus, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Middle name of Matthew Colvin Creighton (1850-1852), one of the three young Creighton boys who died of “paralysis” the year Jethro was born, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

Hallam

August 17, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
An English last name, meaning “at the rocks”, “at the nook”, “from the hills”, or “remote valley”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hal, Hall, Hallum, Halm, Halum.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Middle name of Jethro Hallam Creighton (b. 1852), the young boy through whose eyes we view the events of Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

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