Jonathan

September 9, 2015 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Hebrew “Yehonatan” or “Yonatan”, meaning “Jehovah has given” or “gift of God”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Gionata, Ionathan, Johnathan, Johnathon, Johnnie, Johnny, Jon, Jonatas, Jonathon, Jonatan, Jonaton, Jon-jon, Jonni, Jonnie, Jonny, Jontie, Jonty, Nat, Nate, Nathan, Nattie, Natty, Yehonatan, Yonatan, Yoni, Yonni, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Jonathan Lyte, the sly and selfish wealthy merchant who was Johnny’s great-uncle, though he refused to acknowledge the connection, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).
– Jonathan Lyte Tremain (called “Johnny“), the gifted and proud teenaged hero of Johnny Tremain.

WRITERS:
– Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), Irish author, cleric, essayist, poet, and satirist.

Advertisements

Ebenezer

August 21, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “stone of help”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ben, Bennie, Benny, Eb, Ebb, Eben, Eben-ezer, Ebeneezer, Ez, Eez, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ebenezer Carron (called “Eb“; b. 1843), Jethro’s cousin, a hot-headed young man who joins Tom in running off to enlist in the Union Army, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Ebenezer Beesley (1840-1906), Anglo-American composer and hymn-writer.
E. (Ebenezer) Cobham Brewer (1810-1897), English lexicographer and writer.
Ebenezer Cooke (c.1665-c.1732), English poet and satirist.
Ebenezer Elliott (1781-1849), English activist and poet.
Ebenezer Erskine (1680-1754), Scottish minister and writer.
Ebenezer Forrest (fl. 1774), English attorney, dramatist, and writer.
Ebenezer Jones (1820-1860), English poet.
Ebenezer Landells (1808-1860), English artist, children’s book writer, illustrator, and publisher.
Ebenezer Joseph Mather (1849-1927), English philanthropist and writer.
Ebenezer Porter (1772-1834), American minister, translator, and writer.
Ebenezer Prout (1835-1909), English composer, teacher, and writer.
Ebenezer Rhodes (1762-1839), English artist, editor, poet, publisher, topographer, and writer.
Ebenezer Platt Rogers (1817-1881), American author and minister.
Ebenezer Sibley (1751-c.1799), English astrologer, physician, and writer.
Ebenezer Syme (1825-1860), Scottish-Australian journalist and publisher.
Ebenezer Thomas (1802-1863), Welsh poet and teacher who also published under the pen name “Eben Fardd”.

Alban

December 19, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the Latin place name, meaning “from Alba”, derived from the Latin word “albus”, meaning “white”. Also the name of a prominent English saint.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Albano, Albanus, Albany, Alben, Albin, Albinus, Aubin, Aubyn, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Duke Alban, whose land needs to be saved from a rampaging ogre, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

WRITERS:
– Alban Butler (1710-1773), English author and priest.
– Alban Stoltz (1808-1883), German author and theologian.
– Alban Thomas (c. 1660?-c.1740), Welsh cleric, poet, and translator.

Matthew

October 4, 2014 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
English form of the Greek “Matthaios”, from the Hebrew “Mattityahu”, meaning “gift of the Lord”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Mads, Maitiu, Makaio, Mat, Mateo, Mateu, Matfey, Mathew, Mathias, Mathieu, Mathis, Matias, Matko, Mats, Matt, Matteo, Matteus, Mattheus, Matthias, Matthieu, Matthijs, Matti, Mattie, Matty, Matvei, Motya, Thijs, Tias, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Brother Matthew, one of the monks at St. Mark’s, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.
Matthew Benjamin Creighton (called “Matt“), Ellen’s husband and Jethro’s father, a well-respected farmer of integrity and compassion, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).
Matthew Colvin Creighton (1850-1852), one of the three young Creighton boys who died of “paralysis” the year Jethro was born, in Across Five Aprils.

WRITERS:
– Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), English poet and critic.
– Matthew Henry (1662-1714), Welsh minister and religious writer.
– Matthew Josephson (1899-1978), American author and journalist.
– Matthew Lewis (1775-1818), English dramatist and novelist.
– Matthew Wren (1629-1672), English politician and writer.

Rowland

August 22, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Medieval variation of “Roland“, meaning “famous land”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Laurand, Laurant, Laurend, Laurent, Lorend, Lorent, Lorand, Lorant, Roel, Roeland, Rolan, Roland, Rolando, Rolland, Rollie, Rolly, Roly, Rowle, Rowley, Rowlie, Orland, Orlando, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Rowland Doone, a member of the murderous Doone clan, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).
Sir Rowland Nasmyth, who falls in love with Mistress Marian, in “Nurse Crumpet Tells the Story” (written in 1887, set circa 1630s-1669), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales (1888), by Amélie Rives.
Sir Rowland, his son, who marries Lady Anne Lennox, older sister to Lady Dorothy and Lord Humphrey, in “Nurse Crumpet Tells the Story” (written in 1887, set circa 1630s-1669), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales.
Rowland Rochester, Edward Rochester’s older brother, whose death gives him the ownership of Thornfield, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

Ernie

August 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Ernest”, meaning “serious”, “vigor”, or “intent”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Earnest, Ern, Ernest, Ernesto, Erno, Ernst, Erny, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lord Ernie Radnor, Lady Elizabeth’s nephew, who is brought up with her daughter Patience, and adopted daughter Marian, in “Nurse Crumpet Tells the Story” (written in 1887, set circa 1630s-1669), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales (1888), by Amélie Rives.

Patience

August 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
One of the “virtue” names created by the Puritans. Guess what it means? If you guessed, “patience”, you’re right! If you did not guess “patience”, you are . . . not right.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Possibly Pat / Patti / Pattie / Patty? Paysh? Payshie? Possibly?

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lady Patience Lennox, Lady Elizabeth’s first daughter, a beautiful, elfin creature who was inaptly named, in “Nurse Crumpet Tells the Story” (written in 1887, set circa 1630s-1669), from A Brother to Dragons, and Other Old Time Tales (1888), by Amélie Rives.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with 1660s at The Art of Literary Nomenclature.