Dickon

October 4, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Medieval diminutive of “Richard“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Dickey, Dickie, Dickson, Dicky, Dicun, Dix, Dixon, Rhisiart, Ric, Ricard, Ricardo, Rich, Richard, Richie, Rick, Rickey, Rickie, Ricky, Rico, Ritchie, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Dickon, one of the boys Robin plays with during his stay at St. Mark’s, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

Hubert

October 4, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Germanic, meaning “bright heart” or “bright mind”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hobart, Hubertus, Hubrecht, Uberto, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Brother Hubert, a monk at St. Mark’s, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

WRITERS:
– Hubert Aquin (1929-1977), Canadian activist, essayist, filmmaker, and novelist.
– Hubert Howe Bancroft (1832-1918), American ethnologist and historian.
– Hubert Butler (1900-1991), Irish essayist.
– Hubert Crackanthorpe (1870-1896), English writer.
– Hubert Fichte (1935-1986), German novelist.
– Hubert Lampo (1920-2006), Flemish author.
– Hubert Harrison (1883-1927), West Indian-American activist, critic, educator, orator, and writer.
– Hubert Selby, Jr. (1928-2004), American writer.

Geoffrey

October 4, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Jeffrey”, from the French version of a Germanic name, meaning “peaceful land” or “peace of God”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Fredo, Geffrey, Geoff, Geoffroi, Geoffroy, Gjord, Godfrey, Godfried, Goffredo, Goraidh, Gottfrid, Gottfried, Jef, Jeff, Jefferson, Jeffery, Jeffrey, Jeffries, Jeffry, Jep, Jepson, Seafra, Sieffre, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Geoffrey Atte-Water, the little boy who. like Robin, must use crutches, and who gives Robin the nickname “Crookshanks”, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

WRITERS:
– Geoffrey of Monmouth (c. 1100-1155), Welsh cleric and chronicler.
– Geoffrey the Baker (died c. 1360), English chronicler, also known as Walter of Swinbroke.
– Geoffrey Blainey (b. 1930), Australian academic, commentator, historian, and philanthropist.
– Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400), English poet, philosopher, alchemist, and astronomer, the “Father of English literature”.
– Geoffrey du Breuil of Vigeois (active 1170-1184), French cleric and chronicler.
– Geoffrey Elton (1921-1994), Anglo-German educator, historian and writer.
– Geoffrey Green (1911-1990), English sports writer.
– Geoffrey Household (1920-1988), English novelist.
– Geoffrey Jenkins (1920-2001), South African journalist, novelist, and screenwriter.
– Geoffrey Moorhouse (1931-2009), English author and journalist.
– Geoffrey Trease (1909-1998), English author.
– Geoffrey Willans (1911-1958), English author and journalist.

Matthew

October 4, 2014 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
English form of the Greek “Matthaios”, from the Hebrew “Mattityahu”, meaning “gift of the Lord”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Mads, Maitiu, Makaio, Mat, Mateo, Mateu, Matfey, Mathew, Mathias, Mathieu, Mathis, Matias, Matko, Mats, Matt, Matteo, Matteus, Mattheus, Matthias, Matthieu, Matthijs, Matti, Mattie, Matty, Matvei, Motya, Thijs, Tias, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Brother Matthew, one of the monks at St. Mark’s, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.
Matthew Benjamin Creighton (called “Matt“), Ellen’s husband and Jethro’s father, a well-respected farmer of integrity and compassion, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).
Matthew Colvin Creighton (1850-1852), one of the three young Creighton boys who died of “paralysis” the year Jethro was born, in Across Five Aprils.

WRITERS:
– Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), English poet and critic.
– Matthew Henry (1662-1714), Welsh minister and religious writer.
– Matthew Josephson (1899-1978), American author and journalist.
– Matthew Lewis (1775-1818), English dramatist and novelist.
– Matthew Wren (1629-1672), English politician and writer.

Elfred

October 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Variation of “Alfred“, meaning “elf-counsel”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Aelfraed, Al, Alf, Alfie, Alfred, Alfredo, Fred, Freddie, Freddy, Fredo, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Elfred the Dane, one of Sir John de Bureford’s retainers, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

Rolfe

October 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Rolf”, from the Germanic “Rudolf”, meaning “fame-wolf”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hrolf, Ralph, Raoul, Raul, Roel, Roelof, Roffe, Rolf, Rolph, Rolphe, Rollin, Rollo, Roul, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Rolfe the Bowyer, one of Sir John de Bureford’s retainers, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

WRITERS:
– Rolfe Humphries (1894-1969), American poet, translator, and teacher.

Paul

October 3, 2014 § 5 Comments

ORIGIN:
Latin, from the Roman family name “Paulus”, meaning “small” or “humble”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Boulus, Bulus, Pablo, Pal, Pali, Palle, Paol, Paolo, Paulie, Paulo, Paulos, Paulus, Pauwel, Pasha, Pavel, Pavlo, Pavlos, Pavo, Pavol, Pawel, Pol, Poul, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Paul, a new boy at Lily’s school, “imported from Switzerland”, who “soon becomes the Charles Boyer of the fourth grade”, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).
Brother Paul, one of the monks at St. Mark’s, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

WRITERS:
Paul Bowles (1910-1999), American author, composer, and translator.
Paul Cain (1902-1966), pen name of American author and screenwriter George Caryl Sims.
Paul Goodman (1911-1972), American intellectual, novelist, philosopher, playwright, poet, psychotherapist, and social critic.
Paul Jennings (1918-1989), British humorist and writer.
Paul Jennings (b. 1943), Australian children’s book writer.
Paul Jordan-Smith (1885-1971), American editor, minister, scholar, and writer.
Paul Kenyon (b. 1947), pen name of American fantasy, science fiction, and Western author Robert E. Vardeman, who has also published under the pen names “Cliff Garnett”, “Daniel Moran”, “F.J. Hale”, “Edward S. Hudson”, “Jackson Lowry”, “Karl Lassiter”, and “Victor Appleton”.
Paul Ledd (b. 1951), one of the many pen names of American mystery and Western author Robert J. Randisi, who also publishes as “Cole Weston”, “Joseph Meek”, “Joshua Randall”, “Lew Baines”, “Robert Lake” “Spenser Fortune”, “Tom Cutter”, and “W.B. Longley”, among other pseudonyms.
Paul Smith (1920-1997), Irish playwright and writer.
Paul Girard Smith (1894-1968), American screenwriter.
Paul Verlaine (1844-1896), French poet.
Paul Zindel (1936-2003), American educator, novelist, and playwright.

Millicent

October 3, 2014 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Germanic “Amalasuintha”, meaning “work-strength”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Melicent, Melisent, Melisande, Melisende, Mila, Mili, Milla, Milli, Millie, Milly, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Millicent, Brother Luke’s cat in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

WRITERS:
– Millicent Armstrong (1888-1973), Australian playwright and farmer.
– Millicent Garrett Fawcett (1947-1929), English novelist and writer.
– M. (Millicent) Travis Lane (b. 1934), Canadian poet.
– Millicent Mackenzie (1863-1942), English educator and writer.
– Millicent Murby (1873-1951), English activist and author.
– Millicent Selsam (1912-1996), American children’s book writer.

Wat

October 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Medieval diminutive of “Walter“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Gautier, Gualtiero, Valter, Waldhar, Wally, Walt, Walter, Walther, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Wat Hokester, a local merchant whose dishonesty gets him into trouble, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

Gregory

October 3, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the Greek “Gregorios”, via the Latin “Gregorius”, meaning “watchful” or “alert”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Goyo, Greagoir, Greg, Grega, Greger, Gregg, Grégoire, Gregor, Gregorio, Gregorios, Gregorius, Greer, Greig, Grigol, Grigor, Grigore, Grigori, Grigoriy, Grigory, Griogair, Grisha, Grzegorz, Hryhoriy, Reijo, Reko, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Gregory, the gardener, one of the servants who was supposed to look after Robin while his parents were away, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.

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