The Origins of 10 Nicknames

September 20, 2014 § Leave a comment

How did we get “Dick” from “Richard“? “Bill” from “William“? “Hank” from “Henry” and “Jack” from “John“? Why does “Chuck” come from “Charles“, “Peggy” from “Margaret“, and “Ted” from “Edward“? Where did we get “Harry” from “Henry” and “Jim” from “James“? And why is “Sally” from “Sarah“?

Click through to find out!


The Origins of 10 Nicknames

Naming Danger!

September 20, 2014 § Leave a comment

Here’s an amusing little satirical article on the risks of giving your children unusual or oddly-spelled names. Parents, you have been warned:

Mutated Pediatric Names Linked to Higher Mortality

Ensie

September 16, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Ensor“, “Ennis”, “Enos”, “Enoch”, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Eni, Eny, Enni, Ennie, Enny, Ensi, Ensy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ensie (Ensor) Doone (later re-named Jones), Carver’s young son, who adores and is adopted by John Ridd following the assault on the Doone stronghold, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Ikey

September 16, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Isaac” or “Ichabod”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Iikka, Iiro, Ike, Ikie, Ikka, Isa, Isak, Iza, Sahak, Sekel, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ikey (Ike), an old yeoman who joins in the assault on the Doone stronghold, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Ike

September 16, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Isaac” or “Ichabod”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Iikka, Iiro, Ikey, Ikie, Ikka, Isa, Isak, Iza, Sahak, Sekel, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ike (sometimes called “Ikey“), an old yeoman who joins in the assault on the Doone stronghold, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

QUOTATIONS:
– “Sweet Betsy from Pike” is an American ballad, written in the 1850s: “Did you ever hear tell of sweet Betsy from Pike / Who crossed the wide mountains with her lover Ike?”

Honour

September 16, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Latin, meaning “honor” (and also alternately spelled “Honor”), this is one of the “virtue” names created and embraced by the Puritans.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Honor, Honora, Honoria, Honorata, Nora, Norah, Noreen, Norene, Norina, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Honour Jose, the Badcock’s maid, who is able to hide from the Doone’s during the raid on the farmhouse, and consequently testify to their cruelty in murdering the Badcock’s child, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Christopher

September 16, 2014 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Greek “Christophoros”, meaning “bearer of Christ”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Chip, Chris, Christie, Christoffel, Christoffer, Christophe, Christophoros, Christy, Cris, Cristobal, Cristoforo, Hristo, Hristofor, Kester, Kit, Kris, Kristof, Kristoffer, Kristofor, Kristopher, Krsto, Krystof, Krzys, Krzysiek, Krzysztof, Risto, Toph, Topher, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Christopher Badcock (called “Kit“), the innocent farmer whose young child is murdered while his wife, Margery, is carried off by the Doones, the final outrage which causes the locals to rise up against this scourge in their midst, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

WRITERS:
– Christopher Fry (1907-2005), English poet and playwright.
– Christopher Hitchens (1949-2011), Anglo-American author, debater, journalist, and polemicist.
– Christopher Isherwood (1904-1986), English novelist.
– Christopher Koch (1932-2013), Australian novelist.
– Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), English dramatist, poet, and translator.
– Christopher Morley (1890-1957), American essayist, journalist, novelist, and poet.
– Christopher Nolan (1965-2009), Irish author and poet.

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