Josiah

September 15, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “Jehovah supports”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Iosias, Jos, Josias, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Josiah Bowden, the local parson in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).
Josiah Quincy, the “best young lawyer in Boston”, who defends Johnny against charges of theft and fraud, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
– Josiah Conder (1789-1855), English author and editor.
– Josiah Gregg (1806-1850), American author, explorer, merchant, and naturalist.
– Josiah Henson (1789-1883), American-Canadian abolitionist, author, and minister.
– Josiah Gilbert Holland (1819-1881), American novelist and poet who sometimes used the pen name “Timothy Titcomb”.
– Josiah Quincy III (1772-1864), American historian and politician.
– Josiah Priest (1788-1851), American pseudohistorical and pseudoscientific writer.
– Josiah Strong (1847-1916), American author, clergyman, editor, and organizer.
– Josiah Tucker (1713-1799), Welsh churchman, economist, and political writer.

Jasper

September 15, 2014 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
From Persian, meaning “treasurer”, or referring to the gemstone.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cas, Caspar, Casper, Gaspar, Gaspard, Gaspare, Gasparo, Gaszi, Jas, Jaspar, Jesper, Kaspar, Kasper, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Jasper Flight, a prospector for Dr. Archie’s company, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).
Jasper Kebby, a local yeoman whose farm neighbors Ridd’s and Snowe’s, though is far less prosperous than either, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Charlie

September 15, 2014 § 7 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Charley“, a diminutive or feminine form of “Charles“, meaning “man”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
For girls: Carla, Carlotta, Carola, Carolina, Caroline, Charlize, Charlotta, Karla, Karola, Karolina, Let, Lettie, Letty, Lotta, Lotte, Lottie, Lotty, Tot, Tottie, Totty, etc.
For boys: Carl, Carlos, Carroll, Charles, Charley, Chas, Chaz, Chick, Chip, Chuck, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Charlie (Charleworth) Doone, who tries to compete with Carver for Lorna’s hand, though she despises them both for their violence and cruelty, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).
Charlie (Charles) Drouet, the traveling salesman who first offers Carrie a way out of her poverty, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).

Charleworth

September 15, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Possible variation of “Charlesworth”, an English place name meaning “jagged or jaw-like enclosure”, or “Charlton”, an English place name meaning “Charles’ town”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Chalesworth, Charlie, Charles, Charley, Charleston, Charlesworth, Charlton, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Charleworth Doone (called “Charlie“), who tries to compete with Carver for Lorna’s hand, though she despises them both for their violence and cruelty, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Jerry

September 14, 2014 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Gerald”, “Jeremiah“, “Jeremy“, “Jerome”, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Gerrie, Gerry, Jarmo, Jer, Jere, Jeri, Jeroen, Jerold, Jerri, Jerrie, Jorma, Reme, Remy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Nickname for Jeremy Stickles (sometimes called “Jeremiah” as well), the Court Messenger who, after being sent to bring John Ridd back to London, befriends the Ridd family and aids in the fight against the Doones, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Jeremiah

September 14, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “God has raised high”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hieremias, Ieremias, Jarmo, Jer, Jere, Jeremias, Jeremie, Jeremy, Jerrie, Jerry, Jorma, Reme, Remy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Nickname for Jeremy Stickles (sometimes called “Jerry” as well), the Court Messenger who, after being sent to bring John Ridd back to London, befriends the Ridd family and aids in the fight against the Doones, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

WRITERS:
– Jeremiah Burrows (c. 1600-1646), English preacher and religious writer.
– Jeremiah Curtin (1835-1906), American folklorist and translator.

Jeremy

September 14, 2014 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
Variation of “Jeremiah“, meaning “God has raised high”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Jarmo, Jer, Jere, Jeremiah, Jeremie, Jerrie, Jerry, Jorma, Reme, Remy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Jeremy Stickles (sometimes called “Jerry” or “Jeremiah“), the Court Messenger who, after being sent to bring John Ridd back to London, befriends the Ridd family and aids in the fight against the Doones, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

WRITERS:
– Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832), English philosopher, social reformer, and writer.
– Jeremy Lane (1893-1963), American writer.

Marwood

September 13, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
One of those “last names as first names” that were once a quite popular way for a mother’s maiden name to be passed on to her sons, “Marwood” is possibly from Old French, meaning “evil eye”, or it could be simply an English place name, meaning “boundary wood”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Malregard, Malreward, Merode, Merwood, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Marwood de Whichehalse, Baron Hugh de Whichehalse’s son, who tries to woo Annie Ridd, but keeps bad company in the form of Charlie Doone and his clan, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

Alan

September 13, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Celtic or Breton, possibly meaning “handsome” or “harmony”, or “little rock”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ailin, Al, Alain, Alayne, Alen, Allan, Allen, Alleyn, Allyn, Alun, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Alan-at-Gate, the gruff gatekeeper at Sir Peter’s castle, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.
Lord Alan Brandir, Lorna’s dashing young Scottish cousin, who attempts to rescue her, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).
Alan Krescott, who is, with his twin brother John, included in the “irregular” kids at Lily’s school, due to their having been born prematurely and continuing to be undersized, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

WRITERS:
– Alan Bradley (b. 1938), Canadian writer.
– Alan Burns (1929-2014), English author.
– Alan Dean Forster (b. 1946), American writer.
– Alan Hunter (1922-2005), English author.
– Alan Jay Lerner (1918-1986), American librettist and lyricist.
– Alan Marshall (1902-1984), Australian story teller and writer.
– Alan Paton (1903-1988), South African activist and author.
– Alan Sillitoe (1928-2010), English writer.
– Alan Wade (1916-2013), pen name of American author Jack Vance, who also published under the pen names Ellery Queen, Jay Kavanse, John van See, and Peter Held.

Si

September 13, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Shortened form of “Silas“, “Simon“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Sie, Siem, Sim, Sy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Si (Simon) Carfax, Gwenny’s father, a Cornish miner lured into Essex to work Reuben Huckabuck’s secret mine, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

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