Marwood

September 13, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
One of those “last names as first names” that were once a quite popular way for a mother’s maiden name to be passed on to her sons, “Marwood” is possibly from Old French, meaning “evil eye”, or it could be simply an English place name, meaning “boundary wood”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Malregard, Malreward, Merode, Merwood, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Marwood de Whichehalse, Baron Hugh de Whichehalse’s son, who tries to woo Annie Ridd, but keeps bad company in the form of Charlie Doone and his clan, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).

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