Sylvia

August 16, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Silvia”, feminine form of the Latin name “Silvius”, meaning “of the forest”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Silva, Silvia, Silvie, Silviya, Silvy, Syl, Sylva, Sylvi, Sylvie, Sylwia, Szilvia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Sylvia (Sylvie) Lamonte (called “Syl“), the “little dryad that had slipped from some rose-tree’s bark” who Doctor Tom cures, in “The Story of Little Syl”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

WRITERS:
– Sylvia Plath (1932-1963), American poet, novelist, and short story writer.
– Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893-1978), English novelist and poet.
– Sylvia Wright (1917-1981), American editor, humorist, and writer.

Syl

August 16, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Shortened version of “Sylvia“, “Sylvie“, etc. meaning “of the forest”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Silva, Silvia, Silvie, Silviya, Silvy, Sylva, Sylvi, Sylvia, Sylvie, Sylwia, Szilvia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Little Syl (Sylvie) Lamonte, the “little dryad that had slipped from some rose-tree’s bark” who Doctor Tom cures, in “The Story of Little Syl”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

Sylvie

August 16, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
French version of “Silvia” / “Sylvia“, feminine form of the Latin name “Silvius”, meaning “of the forest”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Silva, Silvia, Silvie, Silviya, Silvy, Syl, Sylva, Sylvi, Sylvia, Sylwia, Szilvia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Sylvie Lamonte (called “Sylvia” or “Syl“), the “little dryad that had slipped from some rose-tree’s bark” who Doctor Tom cures, in “The Story of Little Syl”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889). 

Em

August 16, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Shortened form of “Emma“, “Emmy“, “Emily“, and other names beginning with “Em-“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Amie, Amy, Ema, Emma, Emme, Emmalyn, Emelina, Emeline, Emmaline, Emmeline, Emmie, Emmy, Ima, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Em Mayo, poor little Jessie Mayo’s little sister, one of the girls Doctor Tom tells the story of Sylvie to, in “The Story of Little Syl”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

Bess

August 15, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Shortened version of “Bessie” / “Bessy“, a diminutive of “Elizabeth“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Bessie, Bessy, Betje, Bette, Betsy, Bettie, Bettina, Betty, Bettye, Buffy, Let, Lettie, Letty, Pet, Pettie, Tess, Tessie, Tessy, Tetty, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Bess (Bessie), Laura’s sister, the “Bright-Eyes” Ted tells his rag-bag story to, in “In a Rag-Bag”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

WRITERS:
– Bess Streeter Aldrich (1881-1954), American author.

Bessie

August 15, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternately spelled “Bessy“, a diminutive of “Elizabeth“, meaning “oath of God”. 

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Bess, Bessy, Betje, Bette, Betsy, Bettie, Bettina, Betty, Bettye, Buffy, Let, Lettie, Letty, Pet, Pettie, Tess, Tessie, Tessy, Tetty, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Bessie (sometimes called “Bess“), Laura’s sister, the “Bright-Eyes” Ted tells his rag-bag story to, in “In a Rag-Bag”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).
– Bessie Lee (Leaven, after her marriage), the kind-hearted though quick-tempered nursemaid who looks after Jane and her cousins, the Reeds, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

WRITERS:
– Bessie Head (1937-1986), South African author.

Teddy

August 15, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Like “Ted“, etc., a diminutive of “Edward” or “Theodore“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ed, Edd, Eddi, Eddie, Eddy, Fedir, Fedor, Fedya, Ned, Nedd, Neddie, Neddy, Tad, Taddie, Taddy, Ted, Tedd, Teddie, Teo, Theo, Todor, Toshe, Tudor, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Teddy (Theodore) Shaffer, the little boy who is adopted by Mrs. McNeely, and who falls asleep in a rag-bag, leading to fortune and happiness, in “In a Rag-Bag”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

Ted

August 15, 2014 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Edward” or “Theodore“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ed, Edd, Eddi, Eddie, Eddy, Fedir, Fedor, Fedya, Ned, Nedd, Neddie, Neddy, Tad, Taddie, Taddy, Tedd, Teddie, Teddy, Teo, Theo, Todor, Toshe, Tudor, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Mr. Ted (Theodore) Shaffer (known as “Teddy” when young), who found his long-lost ship captain father while working in a paper mill, in “In a Rag-Bag”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

WRITERS:
– Ted Lewis (1940-1982), English writer.

Theodore

August 15, 2014 § 7 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Greek “Theodoros”, meaning “gift of God”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Fedir, Fedor, Fedya, Feodor, Fyodor, Tad, Taddie, Taddy, Ted, Teddie, Teddy, Tedo, Teo, Teodor, Teodoro, Theo, Theodor, Theodoros, Theodorus, Todor, Toshe, Tudor, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Theodore, Ray Kennedy’s deceased chum, in whose honor he nicknames Thea “Thee”, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).
– Theodore Brocklehurst, one of the children of the formidable and hypocritical supervisor of Lowood Institute, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.
– Theodore Ingram (called “Tedo“), Blanche and Mary’s brother, one of the elegant people who make up Mr. Rochester’s social set, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.
– Mr. Theodore Shaffer (known as “Teddy“, and later “Ted“), who found his long-lost ship captain father while working in a paper mill, in “In a Rag-Bag”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

WRITERS:
– Theodore Dreiser (1871-1945), American novelist and journalist.
– Theodore Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), American writer, poet, and cartoonist, most famous for his work under the pen name “Dr. Seuss”.
– Theodore Roethke (1908-1963), American poet.
– Theodore Taylor (1921-2006), American author.
– Theodore H. White (1915-1986), American journalist and historian.

Dennis

August 15, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the medieval French version of “Dionysios”, derived from the name of the Greek god of wine, dance, revelry, and fertility.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Deion, Den, Denes, Denis, Denney, Denny, Denys, Deon, Dion, Dionysios, Dionysius, Tenney, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Dennis Flannigan, “the great Irish auctioneer”, a denizen of Pump Court, in “In a Rag-Bag”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

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