Amy

August 25, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Old French “Amée”, meaning “beloved”. Sometimes used as a diminutive of “Amelia“, “Emily“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Aimée, Amada, Amata, Amée, Ami, Amie, Emme, Emmie, Emmy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Amy Eshton, the oldest of the Eshton girls, members of Mr. Rochester’s social set, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.
– Amy Robson, Dora’s saucy, slightly snobbish cousin in “That Little Smith Girl” from Nora Perry’s A Flock of Girls and Boys (1895).
– Amy Stanton, a friend of Kitty’s and Laura’s, in “Esther Bodn”, from A Flock of Girls and Boys.

WRITERS:
– Amy Levy (1861-1889), English essayist, novelist, and poet.
– Amy Lowell (1874-1925), American poet.
– Amy Dora Reynolds (1860-1957), American crime author, poet, and romance author who published as “Mrs. Fred Reynolds”.
– Amy Tan (b. 1952), American author.
– Amy Wallace (1955-2013), American writer.
– Amy Witting (1918-2001), pen name of Australian novelist and poet Joan Austral Fraser.

Celine

August 25, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
French feminine form of “Caelinus”, meaning “heaven”, or a diminutive of “Marceline”, from Mars, the Roman god of war, or a variation of “Selene”, the name of a Greek moon goddess.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Caelina, Celena, Celene, Celina, Lena, Lina, Marcelina, Marceline, Marcellina, Marcelyn, Selena, Selene, Selina, Seline, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Céline Varens, the French opera-dancer who was Mr. Rochester’s one-time mistress, and mother of Adèle, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

Sophie

August 25, 2014 § 5 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Sophy“, a diminutive of “Sophia“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Fifi, Sofi, Sofia, Sofie, Sofiya, Sonia, Sonja, Sonya, Sophia, Sophy, Vivi, Zophi, Zophia, Zophie, Zosia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Sophie, Adèle Varens’ French nursemaid, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

WRITERS:
Sophie Leyton (1928-2009), pen name of English romance author Sheila Walsh.

Adela

August 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Germanic, meaning “noble”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ada, Adalyn, Adalynn, Adel, Adele, Adelia, Adelina, Adeline, Adelita, Adella, Adelle, Adelyn, Alena, Alene, Alina, Aline, Alita, Delia, Della, Delle, Dellie, Delly, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Adela (Adèle) Varens, Mr. Rochester’s ward and Jane Eyre’s pupil at Thornfield, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

Adele

August 25, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Variation of “Adela“, meaning “noble”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ada, Adalyn, Adalynn, Adel, Adela, Adelia, Adelina, Adeline, Adelita, Adella, Adelle, Adelyn, Alena, Alene, Alina, Aline, Alita, Delia, Della, Delle, Dellie, Delly, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Adèle Varens (sometimes called “Adela“), Mr. Rochester’s ward and Jane Eyre’s pupil at Thornfield, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

Leah

August 25, 2014 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “weary”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Lea, Lee, Leia, Leigh, Leja, Lia, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Leah, a maid-servant at Thornfield, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

Bobby

August 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Robert” or “Roberta“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
For girls: Bobbi, Bobbie, Roberta, Robertina, Robin, Robina, Robyn, Robynne, etc.
For boys: Bob, Bobbie, Dob, Dobbie, Dobby, Rob, Robb, Robbe, Robbi, Robbie, Robby, Robi, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Bobby, the boy Sheila briefly went “steady” with while on summer vacation with her family, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).
Bobby Leaven, Bessie’s young son, who goes with her when she visits Jane Eyre at Lowood Institute, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

Mary Ann

August 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Marian” or “Marianne“, combining “Mary” with “Ann” / “Anne“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Manon, Marian, Mariana, Marianne, Marie, Marieanne, Marielle, Mariette, Marion, Marise, Mary, Maryann, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Mary Ann Wilson, Jane’s shrewd, observant, and witty friend at Lowood Institute, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

WRITERS:
– Mary Ann Evans (1819-1880), English novelist and journalist who wrote under the pen name “George Eliot”.
Mary Ann O’Malley (1889-1974), English novelist and traveler (also known as “Cottie Sanders”) who published under the pen name “Ann Bridge”.
Mary Ann Shadd (1823-1893), American activist, editor, journalist, and publisher.

Agnes

August 25, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Latinized version of the Greek “Hagne”, meaning “pure” or “chaste”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Aggie, Aggy, Agi, Agnese, Agnessa, Agneta, Agnete, Agnetha, Agneza, Agnieszka, Aigneis, Annice, Annis, Aune, Hagne, Iines, Ines, Inez, Jagna, Janja, Nainsi, Nance, Nancie, Nancy, Nensi, Nes, Neske, Nessie, Nessy, Nest, Nesta, Neysa, Oanez, Ynes, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Dame Agnes, who mends Robin’s clothing in preparation for his journey to Sir Peter’s castle, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.
– Agnes Brendan, a fashionable, stuck-up, ill-behaved Boston girl in “That Little Smith Girl” from Nora Perry’s A Flock of Girls and Boys (1895).
– Agnes Canning, Philip’s mother and the subject of the portrait of the title, in “The Portrait” (1885), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.
– Agnes (later Canning), the young relative of the elder Agnes, in “The Portrait” (1885), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen.
– Agnes Grant, Kitty’s sister in “Esther Bodn”, from A Flock of Girls and Boys.
– Agnes Johnstone, a pupil at Lowood Academy, who, along with her sister Catherine, is invited to tea with some friends at Lowton, resulting in Miss Temple being chastised by Mr. Brocklehurst for allowing “two clean tuckers in the week” when “the rules limit them to one”, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

WRITERS:
– Agnes Newton Keith (1901-1982), American author.
– Agnes Smedley (1892-1950), American journalist and writer.
– Agnes Strickland (c. 1797-1874), English historical writer and poet.

Naomi

August 25, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “pleasant”

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Na’omi, Noemi, Noemia, Noémie, Noemin, Nohemi, Nomi, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Naomi Brocklehurst, the lady who built the new part of Lowood Institute, and whose son overlooks and directs the school, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.

WRITERS:
– Naomi Alderman (b. 1974), English author.
– Naomi Jacob (1884-1964), English actress, author, and broadcaster.
– Naomi Klein (b. 1970), Canadian activist and author.
– Naomi Lewis (1911-2009), English anthologist, author, critic, essayist, and poet.
– Naomi Mitchison (1897-1999), Scottish novelist and poet.
– Naomi Shihab Nye (b. 1952), Palestinian-American novelist, poet, and songwriter.
– Naomi Ragen (b. 1949), American-Israeli activist, author, and playwright.
– Naomi Wolf (b. 1962), American activist and author.

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