Saul

September 21, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From the Hebrew “Sha’ul”, meaning “asked for” or “prayed for”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Saoul, Sauli, Saulius, Shaul, Shuah, Sol, Suah.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Saul, one of Johnny’s acquaintances, an apprentice at one of the shops on the wharf, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
Saul Akkemay (b. 1964), Belgian columnist, novelist, and publicist, who publishes under the pen name “Panbello”.
Saul Alinksy (1909-1972), American activist and writer.
Saul Ascher (1767-1822), German bookseller, translator, and writer.
Saul Bellow (1915-2005), American novelist, playwright, and short story writer.
Saul David (b. 1966), Welsh author, broadcaster, historian, and professor.
Saul Elkins (1907-2001), American director, producer, and screenwriter.
Saul Friedländer (b. 1932), Israeli historian and professor.
Saul Friedman (1929-2010), American educator and journalist.
Saul Landau (1936-2013), American author, commentator, filmmaker, and journalist.
Saul Alves Martins (1917-2009), Brazilian anthropologist, folklorist, and poet.
Saul K. Padover (1905-1981), Austrian-American academic and historian.

Jehu

September 17, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew (pronounced “JEE-hyoo”), meaning “he is Jehovah”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Hieu, Iou, Yehu.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Jehu, Mr. Hancock’s page-boy, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
Jehu O’Cataract (1793-1876), pen name of American author and critic John Neal.

Israel

August 31, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “ruling with the Lord” or “wrestling with the Lord” (from “Yisra’el”, meaning “God contended”).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Is, Iser, Israhel, Isreal, Isreel, Issur, Issy, Iz, Izrael, Izreel, Izzy, Sroel, Yisrael, Yizreel, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Israel Thomas, a friend and neighbor of the Creighton’s, who sometimes brings their mail over from Hidalgo, and who joins in the watch over the Creighton farm when it’s threatened by Guy Wortman and his gang, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Israel the Grammarian (c.895-c.965), Breton (?) philosopher, poet, scholar, theologian, and writer.
Israel Belkind (1861-1929), Russian activist, author, educator, historian, and writer.
Israel Davidson (1870-1939), American publisher and writer.
Israel Friedlander (1876-1920), Polish activist, educator, rabbi, scholar, and translator.
Israel Dov Frumkin (1850-1914), Russian-Palestinian author and journalist.
Israel Gollancz (1863-1930), English editor, professor, scholar, and translator.
Israel Gutman (1923-2013), Polish-Israeli historian.
Israel Horovitz (b. 1939), American actor, director, and playwright.
Israel ben Moses Najara (c.1555-c.1625), Ottoman poet, preacher, and rabbi.
Israel Orenstein (1831-after 1888?), Russian novelist.
Israel Pinkas (b. 1935), Israeli poet.
Israel Regardie (1907-1985), Anglo-American occultist and writer.
Israel Segal (1944-2007), Israeli author, commentator, and journalist.
Israel Joshua Singer (1893-1944), American novelist.
Israel Zangwill (1864-1926), English activist and author.

Ebenezer

August 21, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “stone of help”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ben, Bennie, Benny, Eb, Ebb, Eben, Eben-ezer, Ebeneezer, Ez, Eez, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ebenezer Carron (called “Eb“; b. 1843), Jethro’s cousin, a hot-headed young man who joins Tom in running off to enlist in the Union Army, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

WRITERS:
Ebenezer Beesley (1840-1906), Anglo-American composer and hymn-writer.
E. (Ebenezer) Cobham Brewer (1810-1897), English lexicographer and writer.
Ebenezer Cooke (c.1665-c.1732), English poet and satirist.
Ebenezer Elliott (1781-1849), English activist and poet.
Ebenezer Erskine (1680-1754), Scottish minister and writer.
Ebenezer Forrest (fl. 1774), English attorney, dramatist, and writer.
Ebenezer Jones (1820-1860), English poet.
Ebenezer Landells (1808-1860), English artist, children’s book writer, illustrator, and publisher.
Ebenezer Joseph Mather (1849-1927), English philanthropist and writer.
Ebenezer Porter (1772-1834), American minister, translator, and writer.
Ebenezer Prout (1835-1909), English composer, teacher, and writer.
Ebenezer Rhodes (1762-1839), English artist, editor, poet, publisher, topographer, and writer.
Ebenezer Platt Rogers (1817-1881), American author and minister.
Ebenezer Sibley (1751-c.1799), English astrologer, physician, and writer.
Ebenezer Syme (1825-1860), Scottish-Australian journalist and publisher.
Ebenezer Thomas (1802-1863), Welsh poet and teacher who also published under the pen name “Eben Fardd”.

Shad

August 17, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Shortened version of “Shadrach“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Shadd, Shaddo, Shadoe, Shadrak, Shadrach, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Shad (Shadrach) Yale (b. 1841), the well-educated and eminently reasonable, though tender-hearted, schoolmaster Ellen “adopts”, Jethro idolizes, and Jenny adores, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

Shadrach

August 17, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “commander of Aku (Babylonian god of the moon)”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Shad, Shadd, Shaddo, Shadoe, Shadrak, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Shadrach Yale (sometimes called “Shad“; b. 1841), the well-educated and eminently reasonable, though tender-hearted, schoolmaster Ellen “adopts”, Jethro idolizes, and Jenny adores, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

Jeth

August 14, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Shortened version of “Jethro“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Jethro, Yitro.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Jeth (Jethro) Creighton (b. 1852), the young boy through whose eyes we view the events of Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

Jethro

August 14, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the Hebrew name “Yitro”, meaning “abundance” or “pre-eminence”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Jeth, Yitro.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Jethro Hallam Creighton (sometimes called “Jeth“; b. 1852, so 9 years old at the start of the war), the young boy through whose eyes we view the events of Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).
Jethro Hallam, the “old doctor that the folks set such store by”, who young Jeth was named after, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

Ira

August 9, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “watchful”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
I . . . got nothin’.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ira Tourin, Marty’s younger brother, “born a month prematurely, and . . . permanently trying to catch up”, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

WRITERS:
Ira Aldridge (1807-1867), Anglo-American actor and playwright.
Ira Berkow (b. 1940), American columnist, reporter, and writer.
Ira Berkowitz (b. 1939), American crime author.
Ira Berlin (b. 1941), American author, historian, and professor.
Ira Cohen (1935-2011), American filmmaker, photographer, poet, and publisher.
Ira Eisenstein (1906-2001), American author, rabbi, and theologian.
Ira Lunan Ferguson (1904-1992), American author, essayist, and psychologist.
Ira Joe Fisher (b. 1947), American broadcaster, educator, and poet.
Ira Gitler (b. 1928), American historian and journalist.
Ira Gershwin (1896-1983), American lyricist.
Ira D. Gruber (b. 1934), American author, bibliographer, and historian.
Ira B. Harkey, Jr. (1918-2006), American author, editor, professor, and publisher.
Ira Ishida (b. 1960), Japanese actor, commentator, novelist, and short story writer.
Ira M. Lapidus (b. 1937), American author, historian, and professor.
Ira Levin (1929-2007), American dramatist, novelist, and songwriter.
Ira Lewis (1932-2015), American actor, playwright, and writer.
Ira Louvin (1924-1965), pen name of American musician, singer, and songwriter Ira Lonnie Loudermilk.
Ira Sadoff (b. 1945), American critic, novelist, poet, and short story writer.
Ira Schuster (1889-1945), American songwriter who also published under the pen name “John Siras”.
Ira Stanphil (1914-1993), American songwriter.
Ira Wallach (1913-1995), American novelist and screenwriter.
Ira Wolfert (1908-1997), American reporter and writer.

Edna

August 2, 2015 § 3 Comments

ORIGIN:
Possibly an Anglicized version of the Gaelic “Eithne”, meaning “kernel”, or from Hebrew, meaning “pleasure” or “rejuvenation”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Aithne, Edena, Ednah, Eithne, Ena, Enya, Ethna, Ethne, Etna, Idina, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Edna (or Esther or Etka) Kroll Shaine — “Esther in Hebrew, Edna in English, and Etka in Russian” — Lily’s increasingly-senile grandmother in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

WRITERS:
Edna Anhalt (1914-1987), American screenwriter.
Edna Buchanan (b. 1938/39), American crime author, journalist, and novelist.
Edna Ferber (1885-1968), American novelist, playwright, and short story writer.
Edna (E.) Mayne Hull (1905-1975), Canadian science fiction author.
Edna Iturralde (b. 1948), Ecuadorian children’s book author.
Edna Lewis (1916-2006), American author and chef.
Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950), American poet and playwright who also published under the pen name “Nancy Boyd”.
Edna O’Brien (b. 1930), Irish memoirist, novelist, playwright, poet, and short story writer.
Edna Osser (1919-2005), American songwriter.
Edna Staebler (1906-2006), Canadian author and journalist.

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