Dorcas

September 12, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Greek variation of the Arabic name “Tabitha”, meaning “gazelle”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Dodie, Dody, Dor, Dora, Dorri, Dorrie, Dorry, Dory, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Dorcas Lapham, Mrs. Lapham’s second-oldest daughter, “built like Madge, but not so loud-voiced, nor as roughly good-natured”, who “thirsted for elegance” and is frequently “painfully prissy [and] proper”, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
Dorcas Cochran Jewell (c.1903-1991), American lyricist and screenwriter.

Advertisements

Ava

July 12, 2015 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternately spelled “Eva”. Possibly an English variation of “Eve”, meaning “to breathe” or “to live”; or from Persian, meaning “voice” or “sound”; or from Greek, meaning “bird-like”; or a shortened version of Germanic names such as “Avis” or “Avila”, or even “Hedwig”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Avalina, Avaline, Avalyn, Avelina, Aveline, Avelyn, Aven, Aveza, Aviana, Aviance, Avice, Avila, Avis, Aviva, Chava, Chavah, Chave, Chavilah, Eabha, Eeva, Eevi, Efa, Eua, Eva, Eve, Evelia, Evie, Evika, Evita, Evvie, Evvy, Ewa, Hava, Havilah, Havva, Hawa, Ieva, Iva, Ivah, Yeva, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Ava, founder and leader of Camp Ava, where Lily spends a miserable summer, in Sleeping Arrangements, by Laura Cunningham (published 1989, set in the 1950s).

WRITERS:
Ava (c.1060-1127), German poet, also known as “Ava of Göttweig”, “Ava of Melk”, or “Frau Ava”.
Ava DuVernay (b. 1972), American director and screenwriter.

Amalthea

December 19, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of the Greek “Amaltheia”, meaning “tender goddess” (after one of the foster mothers of the god Zeus).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Amaltheia, Thea, Theia.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Lady Amalthea, the name Schmendrick gives to the unicorn when she is in her human form, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

Nikos

December 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
A shortened version of  the Greek “Nikolaos”, meaning “victory of the people”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cai, Caj, Claes, Claus, Col, Colas, Cole, Colet, Colin, Collin, Kai, Kaj, Kay, Klaas, Klaes, Klas, Klaus, Kolya, Miklos, Mikolas, Miksa, Mykola, Neacel, Nels, Nic, Niccolo, Nichol, Nicholas, Nichols, Nick, Nickie, Nickolas, Nicky, Nico, Nicol, Nicola, Nicolas, Nicolaas, Nicolaos, Nicolau, Nicolaus, Nicolo, Nicos, Niek, Niels, Nigul, Nik, Nika, Nikko, Niklas, Niklaus, Niko, Nikola, Nikolai, Nikolaj, Nikolajs, Nikolaos, Nikolas, Nikolaus, Nikolay, Nikoloz, Niksa, Nikusha, Nils, Nixon, Nykko, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Nikos, the great wizard who tried his best to teach Schmendrick everything he knew, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

WRITERS:
– Nikos Engonopoulos (1907-1985), Greek painter and poet.
– Nikos Gatsos (1911-1992), Greek lyricist, poet, and translator.
– Nikos Hadjikyriakos-Ghikas (1906-1994), Greek academic, artist, and writer.
– Nikos Karouzos (1926-1990), Greek poet.
– Nikos Kavvadias (1910-1975), Greek poet and writer.
– Nikos Nicolaides (1884-1956), Greek painter and writer.
– Nikos Nikolaidis (1939-2007), Greek director, producer, and writer.
– Nikos Tsiforos (1916-1970), Greek director and screenwriter.

Irene

November 15, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Usually pronounced “ie-REEN”, “ie-REE-nee”, or “ee-RE-ne”; from the Greek “Eirene”, meaning “peace”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Arina, Arine, Arisha, Eireen, Eirene, Ena, Ira, Irena, Irenka, Iria, Irina, Irine, Irja, Iryna, Rene, Renee, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Irene Andersen, who rents a room in the home she shares with her mother, Mrs. Lorch, to Thea Kronborg, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).

WRITERS:
– Irene Ibsen Bille (1901-1985), Norwegian novelist and playwright.
– Irene Hunt (1907-2001), American children’s book writer.
– Irène Némirovsky (1903-1942), Russian novelist.

Gus

November 6, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Shortened version of “Augustus”, “Angus”, “Gustave”, etc. Sometimes used as a diminutive of “Constantine”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Guus, Kusti, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Gus Kronborg, Thea’s oldest brother, in The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather (written in 1915 and set in the 1890s).

WRITERS:
– Gus Kahn (1886-1941), American lyricist.
– Gus Tyler (1911-2011), American activist, author, and columnist.

Agatha

October 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the Greek word “agathos”, meaning “good”, by way of the Latin name “Agathe”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Agata, Agathe, Agda, Agi, Aggie, Aggy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Agatha Mortimer, one of Roland’s sisters in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.

WRITERS:
– Agatha Christie (1890-1976), English crime novelist, playwright, and short story writer.

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with Greek at The Art of Literary Nomenclature.