Connie

October 25, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Constance“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Constance, Constantia, Constanza, Constanze, Konstancja, Konstanze, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Connie Turner, the little girl who Lady Mary appears to in order to right a sad wrong, in “Old Lady Mary” (1884), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.

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Sandy

October 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
For boys, a diminutive of “Alexander“, etc. For girls, a diminutive of “Alexandra”, “Sandra“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
For girls: Sandie, Sandrine, Sasha, Sassa, Saundra, Shura, Sondra, Sondrine, Szandra, Xandra, Zandra, etc.
For boys: Sacha, Sander, Sandor, Sandro, Sascha, Saunder, Sawney, Sender, Shura, Skender, Xander, Zander, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Sandy Jarvis, the coachman at Brentwood, who is able to give Col. Mortimer some information regarding the haunting of the ruined estate, in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.

WRITERS:
– Sandy Frank (1954-2014), American comedy and television writer.
– Sandy Wilson (1924-2014), English composer and lyricist.

Jeanie

October 25, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Jean”, a medieval variation of “Jane“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Jean, Jeane, Jeanne, Jeannie, Jeanette, Jeanine, Jeannette, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Miss Jeanie, one of Aunt Mary’s friends, in “The Library Window” (1896), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.
– Jeanie Mortimer, one of Roland’s sisters in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen.

Agatha

October 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From the Greek word “agathos”, meaning “good”, by way of the Latin name “Agathe”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Agata, Agathe, Agda, Agi, Aggie, Aggy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Agatha Mortimer, one of Roland’s sisters in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.

WRITERS:
– Agatha Christie (1890-1976), English crime novelist, playwright, and short story writer.

Roland

October 25, 2014 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
Germanic, meaning “famous land”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Laurand, Laurant, Laurend, Laurent, Lorend, Lorent, Lorand, Lorant, Roel, Roeland, Rolan, Rolando, Rolland, Rollie, Rolly, Roly, Rowland, Rowle, Rowley, Rowlie, Orland, Orlando, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Roland Mortimer, the kind-hearted boy whose concern for a lost soul nearly destroys him, in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.

WRITERS:
– Roland Leighton (1895-1915), English poet and soldier.

Willie

August 27, 2014 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “William“, meaning “will-helmet”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Bil, Bill, Billie, Billy, Gwil, Liam, Lyam, Pim, Vila, Vili, Viljo, Ville, Wil, Wilkie, Wilkin, Wilky, Will, Willis, Willy, Wim, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Willie, the poor lost soul whose grief drives young Roland Mortimer to distraction, and nearly to death, in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.
Willie, a shopboy who works at the Chicago shoe factory where Carrie first finds employment, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).
Willie Gentle, the young minstrel in Captain Cully’s band of freebooters, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.
Willie (Will) Wentworth, a friendly, level-headed Boston boy in “That Little Smith Girl” from Nora Perry’s A Flock of Girls and Boys (1895).

WRITERS:
– Willie Gilbert (1916-1972), American author and playwright.
– Willie Morris (1934-1999), American editor and writer.
– Willie Rushton (1937-1996), English actor, author, cartoonist, comedian, and satirist.
– Willie Yeadon (1907-1997), English historian.

Janet

August 25, 2014 § 6 Comments

ORIGIN:
Medieval diminutive of “Jane“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Jan, Jana, Janae, Janelle, Janetta, Janette, Janey, Janie, Janice, Janis, Janith, Janna, Jannah, Jannetta, Jannette, Jayna, Jayne, Jaynie, Jean, Jeanette, Jeanne, Jenae, Jenna, Jennet, Jenni, Jenny, Joan, Joanie, Joanne, Joanna, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Janet, the pet name Mr. Rochester occasionally gives to Jane, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.
– Janet, a maidservant in Aunt Mary’s household, in “The Library Window” (1896), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.

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