Moses

August 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “saved” or “son”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Mo, Moe, Moey, Moises, Moishe, Moisey, Mose, Moshe, Moss, Musa, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Moses Pennel, Becky Moore’s country suitor in “Mountain-Laurel and Maiden-Hair”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

Bella

August 10, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Like “Belle“, a diminutive of “Belinda”, “Beulah”, etc., or names ending in “-ella” (such as “Isabella”, “Annabella”, “Arabella“, etc.), or names ending in “-belle” (such as “Maybelle”, “Dorabelle”, etc.) Possibly from Italian, meaning “beautiful”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Arabel, Arabella, Arabelle, Amabel, Amabella, Amabelle, Anabel, Anabella, Anabelle, Annabel, Annabella, Annabelle, Bell, Belle, Belina, Belinda, Belinha, Beulah, Elizabeth, Isabel, Isabella, Isabelle, Izabel, Izabella, Izabelle, Sabella, Sabelle, Zabel, Zabella, Zabelle, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Bella, little Rosamond Carey’s favorite doll, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.
Cousin Bella, who introduces Susy to the concept of Fate, without being clear on how much our actions may influence it, in “Susy’s Dragon”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).
Bella (Isabella) Knightley, the older of John and Isabella’s two daughters, in Jane Austen’s Emma (1815).
Bella (Isabella) McGilvray, the daughter of a wash-woman and house-cleaner who lives in the tenement behind Grandpa Bennet’s house, and who Katy befriends, in “That Ridiculous Child”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories.

Cis

August 10, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Cecily” / “Cicely“, “Cecelia”, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cecile, Cecille, Cece, Cecelia, Cecelie, Cecilia, Cecilie, Cecily, Celia, Cili, Cilla, Cille, Cissie, Cissy, Sheila, Silla, Sille, Sissie, Sissy, Zilla, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Cousin Cis (Cecily) Carey, a somewhat frivolous and impatient young lady, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

 

Roxy

August 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Roxana” or “Roxane” / “Roxanne”, meaning “bright” or “dawn”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Rockie, Rocky, Roksana, Rosana, Roshanak, Rossana, Roxana, Roxane, Roxanne, Roxie, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Roxy, the maid at the Carey house in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

Rosy

August 10, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Rosey” / “Rosie“; diminutive of “Rose“, “Rosa“, names beginning with “Ros-“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Rohese, Rohesia, Ros, Rosa, Rosabel, Rosaleen, Rosalie, Rosalind, Rosaline, Rosamond, Rosamonde, Rosamund, Rosanne, Rose, Roselin, Roselind, Rosella, Roselle, Rosemond, Rosemund, Rosetta, Rosette, Rosey, Rosie, Rosina, Rosine, Rosita, Roslyn, Royse, Roz, Roza, Rozelle, Rozie, Rozy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Rosy (Rosamond) Carey, the “Button-Rose” who brings peace and joy to the lives of several cranky adults, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

Calvin

August 10, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From a French last name “Chauvin”, from Latin, meaning “bald”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cal. And, um… Cal. Maybe Vin?

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Calvin, Cousin Henrietta Carey’s lost love, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.
– Prince Calvin, one of Princess Alison Jocelyn’s three brothers, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

WRITERS:
– Calvin C. Hernton (1932-2001), American author, poet, and sociologist.
– Calvin Hoffman (1906-1986), American author and critic.
– Calvin Thomas (1854-1919), American educator, scholar, and writer.
– Calvin Trillin (b. 1935), American writer.
– Calvin Ziegler (1854-1930), German-American poet.

Mamie

August 10, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Mary” / “Marie” / “Maria“, “May“, or “Margaret“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Mae, Madge, Maggie, Maggy, Maisie, Maisy, Mame, Marge, Margie, Margy, Mariella, Marietta, Marji, May, Mayme, Maymie, Meg, Meggie, Meggy, Mia, Midge, Mim, Mimi, Mimsie, Mimsy, Moll, Mollie, Molly, etc. etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Mamie Parsons, Rosamond Carey’s best friend, with whom she sometimes quarrels, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

WRITERS:
Mamie (Mary) Dickens (1838-1896), English editor and writer.

Henny

August 10, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Henrietta” / “Henriette”, or, as a nickname for “Henry“, “Hendrik”, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
For girls: Enrica, Etta, Ettie, Etty, Harriet, Harriett, Harrietta, Harriette, Hattie, Hatty, Hen, Hennie, Henny, Henriette, Henrika, Henrike, Het, Hettie, Hetty, Yetta, etc.
For boys: Amerigo, Amery, Arrigo, Emmerich, Emery, Emory, Enrico, Enrique, Enzo, Hal, Hank, Harald, Harold, Harri, Harry, Heinrich, Heinz, Hennie, Henri, Hendrik, Hendry, Henrik, Henry, Henryk, Herrold, Herry, Imre, Imrich, Imrus, Ric, Rico, Rik, Rikki, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Cousin Henny (Henrietta) Carey, a plump old lady rather inclined to hold grudges, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

Penny

August 10, 2014 § 5 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Penelope“, meaning “weaver”. Could also simply refer to the small coin. Although, if you think about it, it’s a little odd to name someone after money. But, I suppose, people do, nevertheless . . .

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Pen, Pene, Penelope, Penney, Pennie, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Cousin Penny (Penelope) Carey, a quiet old lady who loves children, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

WRITERS:
– Penny Jordan (1946-2011), pen name of English romance author Penelope Halsall, who also published under the pen names “Annie Groves”, “Caroline Courtney”, “Lydia Hitchcock”, and “Melinda Wright”.

Cicely

August 10, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Variant of “Cecily” or “Cecilia”, feminine versions of “Cecil”, from the Latin, meaning “blind”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cecile, Cecille, Cece, Cecelia, Cecelie, Cecilia, Cecilie, Cecily, Celia, Cili, Cilla, Cille, Cissie, Cissy, Sheila, Silla, Sille, Sissie, Sissy, Zilla, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Cicely Carey (called “Cis“), Rosamond’s somewhat frivolous and impatient older cousin, in “Little Button-Rose”, from A Garland for Girls, by Louisa May Alcott, 1887.

WRITERS:
– Cicely Hamilton (1872-1952), English activist, actress, journalist, and writer.
– Cicely Saunders (1918-2005), English activist, nurse, physician, social worker, and writer.
– Cicely (C.) Fox Smith (1882-1954), English poet and writer.

QUOTATIONS:
– From “Cicely Bathing” by Norman Rowland Gale: “The brook told the dove / And the dove told me / That Cicely floating on the wave / Woke music in the tree.”

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