Eugenio

July 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Italian or Spanish form of “Eugene”, from the Greek for “well-born”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Eugene, Gene, Owain, Owen, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Eugenio, the suspiciously attentive courier in Daisy Miller by Henry James (1879).

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Frederick

July 29, 2014 § 7 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Germanic for “peaceful ruler”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Fedde, Federico, Federigo, Fred, Frederic, Frederik, Freddie, Freddy, Fredo, Fredric, Friedrich, Fritz, Ric, Rick, Ricki, Rickie, Ricky, Rico, Rik, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Frederick (called “Fred“, b. 1916), the eighth of the dozen Gilbreth children whose upbringing is related in Cheaper By the Dozen (1948) and Belles on Their Toes (1950), written by Frank Gilbreth, Jr. and Ernestine Gilbreth Carey.
– Frederick Augustus Bullock (called “Fred” by his family), the young man Maria Osborne hopes to marry in Vanity Fair, by William Makepeace Thackeray (published in 1847-48, but set in the 1810s-20s).
– Frederick Augustus Howard Stanley Devereux Bullock is Maria Osborne’s child with Fred Bullock, by whom she hopes to replace Georgy Osborne as heir to Mr. Osborne’s affections and fortune, in Vanity Fair.
– Frederick Deuceace, the gentleman whose house is purchased by Miss Crawley’s former butler, Mr. Charles Raggles, and later rented to Rawdon and Becky, in Vanity Fair.
– Frederick Lynn, one of the Lynn brothers who are members of Mr. Rochester’s social set, in Jane Eyre, 1847, by Charlotte Bronte.
– Frederick Pigeon, who loses badly while gambling at Becky’s house in Florence, in Vanity Fair.
– Frederick Winterbourne, the protagonist in Daisy Miller by Henry James (1879).

Ezra

July 29, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “help” or “helper”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ez? Ezzie? Pretty limited, here.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Ezra Miller, the title character’s wealthy father in Daisy Miller by Henry James (1879).

AUTHORS:
– Ezra Pound (1885-1972), American poet and critic.

Annie

July 29, 2014 § 7 Comments

ORIGIN:
Like “Ann” and “Anne“, a variant form of “Anna“. Could also be a nickname for Anastasia, Andrea, Angela, Angelina, Anita, Annabel, Anthea, Antonia, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ann, Anne, Ann, Nan, Nancy, Nanny, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Annie Grainger, a friend of Kitty’s and Laura’s, in “Esther Bodn”, from Nora Perry’s A Flock of Girls and Boys (1895).
– Annie P. Miller is the title character’s actual given name in Daisy Miller by Henry James (1879).
Annie Ridd (sometimes called “Nanny” or “Nancy“), John’s favorite sister, a sweet little homemaker, in Lorna Doone, by R.D. Blackmore (written in 1869, set in the 1670s-1680s).
Annie Tenney, the skilled nurse hired to help care for Sylvie Lamonte in “The Story of Little Syl”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

WRITERS:
– Annie Dillard (b. 1945), American writer and poet.
– Annie Groves (1946-2011), pen name of English romance author Penelope Halsall, who also published under the pen names “Caroline Courtney”, “Lydia Hitchcock”, “Melinda Wright”, and “Penny Jordan”.
– Annie Fellows Johnston (1863-1931), American children’s book author.
– Annie Shepherd Swan (1859-1943), Scottish journalist, novelist, and writer.

QUOTATIONS:
– The old Scottish song “Annie Laurie“, based on a poem by William Douglas, c. 1685 (rewritten in 1834): “And for bonnie Annie Laurie / I’d lay me down and die”.
– Though “Annie’s Song” (1973) by John Denver doesn’t explicitly mention Annie in the lyrics, it’s still beautiful, and the title might make any Annie feel as though it is especially meant for her.

Daisy

July 29, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Anglo-Saxon flower name, “the day’s eye”. Plant and flower names were popular in the 19th century.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
None, really. Although it seems to be used as a nickname for “Annie“. Go figure.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Daisy Miller, the title character in Daisy Miller by Henry James (1879).

QUOTATIONS:
– The classic popular song “Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two)” by Harry Dacre, 1892: “Daisy, Daisy / Give me your answer, do / I’m half-crazy / All for the love of you”

Randolph

July 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Variant form of “Randall” or “Randolf”, an old Anglo-Saxon word for “shield-wolf”. Either that, or a place name for “fair valley.” You takes your pick, I guess.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Rand, Randal, Randall, Randolf, Randy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Randolph Miller, the title character’s scamp of a younger brother in Daisy Miller by Henry James (1879).

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