Herbert

August 22, 2014 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
Germanic, meaning “bright army”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Bert, Bertie, Berto, Berty, Herb, Herberto, Herbie, Herby, Heribert, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Herbert Crane, one of the snobbish Jessica Hurstwood’s schoolmates, scorned for not being rich, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).
Herbert Kennedy, who hopes to make Ruth forget about David Langston, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter.

WRITERS:
– Herbert Agar (1897-1980), American editor, journalist, and historian.
– Herbert S. Scott (1931-2006), American editor and poet.
– Herbert Spencer (1820-1903), English philosopher, scientist, and writer.
– Herbert George (H.G.) Wells (1866-1946), English writer.

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Emmeline

August 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From the Germanic name “Amelina”, meaning “work”. Sometimes used as a variation of “Emily“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Amalina, Em, Emelina, Emeline, Emma, Emmaline, Emmalyn, Emmie, Emmy, Lena, Lina, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Emmeline Moreland, John Moreland’s wife, who doesn’t appreciate the beauty of Granny Moreland’s antiques, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter.

WRITERS:
– Emmeline B. Wells (1828-1921), American activist, diarist, editor, journalist, and poet.
– Emmeline Pankhurst (1858-1928), English activist, suffragette, and writer.
– Lady Emmeline Stuart-Wortley (1806-1855), English poet and writer.

Amos

August 22, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “burden” or “bearer of a burden”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Um . . . Amy? Actually, no, probably shouldn’t do that.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Amos Peters, a local farmer, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter. 

Lizy

August 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Eliza” or “Elizabeth“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ella, Ellie, Elissa, Eliza, Elsa, Elsie, Elyse, Libby, Liddy, Lisa, Lise, Lisette, Liz, Liza, Lizette, Lizzie, Lizzy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Lizy Crofter, a hired woman, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter.

Marcella

August 22, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Feminine form of “Marcellus”, a Roman last name ultimately derived from Mars, the god of war.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Marcela, Marcelina, Marceline, Marcelle, Marcellette, Marcellina, Marcelline, Marcelyn, Marcie, Marcy, Marsaili, Zella, Zellie, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Marcella Herron, Ruth Jameson’s grandmother, “a gentle woman”, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter.

Alexander

August 22, 2014 § 14 Comments

ORIGIN:
Latin version of the Greek “Alexandros”, meaning “defender of men”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ace, Al, Alasdair, Alastair, Alastar, Ale, Alec, Alejandro, Aleks, Aleksander, Aleksandr, Alessandro, Alex, Alexandre, Alexandros, Alexis, Alick, Alisander, Alistair, Alister, Ally, Eskandar, Iskandar, Lexi, Olek, Oleksander, Oleksandr, Sacha, Sander, Sandor, Sandy, Sandro, Sascha, Saunder, Sawney, Sender, Shura, Sikandar, Skender, Xander, Xandinho, Zander, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Middle name of James Alexander Creighton (1849-1852), one of the three young Creighton boys who died of “paralysis” the year Jethro was born, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).
Alexander Herron, Ruth Jameson’s grandfather, “who made a concession”, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter.

WRITERS:
– Alexander Brown (1843-1906), American historian and writer.
– Alexander Hamilton (1755 or 1757- 1804), American essayist, economist, and political leader.
– Alexander King (1899-1965), Austrian-American humorist and memoirist.
– Alexander Mollin (b. 1947), pen name of English author Jim Williams, who also publishes as “Richard Hugo”.
– Alexander Pope (1688-1744), English poet.
– Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), Russian author and poet.
– Alexander Ross (c.1590-1654), Scottish writer.
– Alexander Scott (c.1520-1582/83), Scottish poet.
– Alexander Scott (1920-1989), Scottish poet and scholar.
Alexander Tayler (1870-1937), British author and historian who published under the pen name of “Alasdair Tayler”, and often published jointly with his sister, Hetty.
– Alexander Wilson (1893-1963), English writer and spy.

Ruthie

August 22, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Ruth“, meaning “friend” or “companion”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ruta, Rute, Ruut, Ruth, Ruthy.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Ruthie (Ruth) Jameson, “a girl of the city” who cannot see herself as the Harvester’s dream girl, in The Harvester (1911) by Gene Stratton Porter.

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