Nikos

December 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
A shortened version of  the Greek “Nikolaos”, meaning “victory of the people”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cai, Caj, Claes, Claus, Col, Colas, Cole, Colet, Colin, Collin, Kai, Kaj, Kay, Klaas, Klaes, Klas, Klaus, Kolya, Miklos, Mikolas, Miksa, Mykola, Neacel, Nels, Nic, Niccolo, Nichol, Nicholas, Nichols, Nick, Nickie, Nickolas, Nicky, Nico, Nicol, Nicola, Nicolas, Nicolaas, Nicolaos, Nicolau, Nicolaus, Nicolo, Nicos, Niek, Niels, Nigul, Nik, Nika, Nikko, Niklas, Niklaus, Niko, Nikola, Nikolai, Nikolaj, Nikolajs, Nikolaos, Nikolas, Nikolaus, Nikolay, Nikoloz, Niksa, Nikusha, Nils, Nixon, Nykko, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Nikos, the great wizard who tried his best to teach Schmendrick everything he knew, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

WRITERS:
– Nikos Engonopoulos (1907-1985), Greek painter and poet.
– Nikos Gatsos (1911-1992), Greek lyricist, poet, and translator.
– Nikos Hadjikyriakos-Ghikas (1906-1994), Greek academic, artist, and writer.
– Nikos Karouzos (1926-1990), Greek poet.
– Nikos Kavvadias (1910-1975), Greek poet and writer.
– Nikos Nicolaides (1884-1956), Greek painter and writer.
– Nikos Nikolaidis (1939-2007), Greek director, producer, and writer.
– Nikos Tsiforos (1916-1970), Greek director and screenwriter.

Schmendrick

December 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
From Hebrew, meaning “fat person”, or Yiddish, meaning “stupid person”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Not sure that there are any.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Schmendrick, the aspiring magician who accompanies the unicorn on her quest to find the rest of her people, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

Rukh

December 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Probably Persian, meaning “face”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
I, um, don’t know.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Rukh, Mommy Fortuna’s henchman and guide at her Midnight Carnival, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

Fortuna

December 18, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Latin, meaning “fortunate” or “lucky”, after the Roman goddess of Fortune (obviously).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Fortune? Maybe Lucky, in a roundabout sort of way?

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Mommy Fortuna, the witch who captures the unicorn for her Midnight Carnival, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

Alison

October 4, 2014 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Medieval French diminutive of “Aalis” (“Alice“).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ali, Alli, Allie, Allison, Alyson, Ally, Allyson, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Alison de Lindsay, Sir Peter and Lady Constance’s daughter, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.
– Princess Alison Jocelyn, the damsel in distress who needs a hero, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.

WRITERS:
– Alison Baker (b. 1953), American short story writer.
– Alison Cockburn (1712-1794), Scottish poet, socialite, and wit (also known as Alison Rutherford or Alicia Cockburn).
– Alison Brackenbury (b. 1953), English poet.
– Alison Des Forges (1942-2009), American activist and historian.
– Alison Fell (b. 1944), Scottish novelist and poet.
– Alison Lester (b. 1952), Australian author and illustrator.
– Alison Lurie (b. 1926), American academic and novelist.
– Alison Plowden (1931-2007), English biographer and historian.
– Alison Uttley (1884-1976), English author.
– Alison Weir (b. 1951), English author, biographer, and historian.

Willie

August 27, 2014 § 4 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “William“, meaning “will-helmet”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Bil, Bill, Billie, Billy, Gwil, Liam, Lyam, Pim, Vila, Vili, Viljo, Ville, Wil, Wilkie, Wilkin, Wilky, Will, Willis, Willy, Wim, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Willie, the poor lost soul whose grief drives young Roland Mortimer to distraction, and nearly to death, in “The Open Door” (1881), from Stories of the Seen and Unseen by Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant.
Willie, a shopboy who works at the Chicago shoe factory where Carrie first finds employment, in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (published in 1900; set 1889-1890s).
Willie Gentle, the young minstrel in Captain Cully’s band of freebooters, in the fantasy novel The Last Unicorn (1968) by Peter S. Beagle.
Willie (Will) Wentworth, a friendly, level-headed Boston boy in “That Little Smith Girl” from Nora Perry’s A Flock of Girls and Boys (1895).

WRITERS:
– Willie Gilbert (1916-1972), American author and playwright.
– Willie Morris (1934-1999), American editor and writer.
– Willie Rushton (1937-1996), English actor, author, cartoonist, comedian, and satirist.
– Willie Yeadon (1907-1997), English historian.

Philura

August 12, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Probably from Latin, meaning “linden tree” or “writing tablet”. Or possibly a variation of “Philippa”, “Phillida”, “Philomena”, “Phyllis”, etc., or of “Pilar”. But probably the Latin one.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Philaura, Phileria, Philleria, Phillire, Philora, Philoria, Philyra, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Philura Maple, the aunt who gave Zeena the cherished, ill-fated, red pickle dish for a wedding present, in Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome (written in 1911, but set in the 1890s or first few years of the 1900s).

Endurance

August 12, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
One of the “virtue” names created by the Puritans, meaning, you know, “endurance”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
I don’t think there are any variations, unless you count all of the other “virtue” names (“Faith”, “Hope”, “Charity”, “Patience”, etc.). As for nicknames . . . whatever. You do what you want.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Endurance Frome, Ethan’s mother, whose death left him lonesome enough to turn to his cousin Zenobia for comfort, in Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome (written in 1911, but set in the 1890s or first few years of the 1900s).

Jotham

August 12, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Hebrew, meaning “Jehovah is upright” or “Jehovah is perfect”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Yotam . . . and . . . that’s it, I guess.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Jotham Powell, the Frome’s hired man, in Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome (written in 1911, but set in the 1890s or first few years of the 1900s).

Andrew

August 12, 2014 § 5 Comments

ORIGIN:
From the Greek “Andreas”, meaning “man”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Aindreas, Aindriu, Ander, Anders, Andi, Andie, Andor, Andre, Andrei, Andres, Andrea, Andreas, Andrius, Andro, Andrus, Andy, Deandre, Drew, Ondre, Ondrei, Ondreas, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Brother Andrew, one of the monks at St. Mark’s, in The Door in the Wall (written in 1949 and set sometime between 1327-1377), by Marguerite de Angeli.
– Andrew Hale, Ned’s father, a builder who frequently does business with Ethan, in Edith Wharton’s Ethan Frome (written in 1911, but set in the 1890s or first few years of the 1900s).

WRITERS:
– Andrew Clements (b. 1949), American children’s book writer.
– Andrew Davies (b. 1936), English novelist and screenplay writer.
– Andrew Gross (b. 1952), American novelist.
– Andrew Murray (1828-1917), South African pastor, teacher, and writer.

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