Madge

September 12, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Margaret” or “Margery” / “Marjorie” / “Marjory“, or possibly even “Martha“.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Maarit, Mae, Maisie, Maisy, Maggi, Maggie, Maggy, Mamie, Maret, Margaux, Marge, Margie, Margit, Margo, Margot, Margy, Marji, May, Meg, Megeen, Megan, Megen, Meggie, Meggy, Midge, Peg, Pegeen, Peggie, Peggy, Peigi, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Madge Lapham, Mrs. Lapham’s oldest daughter, “handsome in a coarse-grained, red-faced, thick-waisted way”, loud-voiced and roughly good-natured, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

Priscilla

September 9, 2015 § 2 Comments

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Prisca”, from a Roman family name meaning “ancient” or “of ancient birth”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cece, Cila, Cili, Cilka, Cilla, Cille, Pricila, Pricilla, Pris, Prisca, Priscila, Priska, Priskilla, Prissie, Prissy, Scilla, Sileas, Silja, Silje, Silke, Sile, Sille, Sisi, Sissie, Sissy, Zilla, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Priscilla Lapham (called “Cilla“), Mrs. Lapham’s devoted, reliable, practical teenaged daughter, who remains a true friend to Johnny through all the turmoil of Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
Priscilla (1735-1812), pen name of English activist, reformer, and writer Ann Jebb.
Priscilla Buckley (1921-2012), American author and editor.
Priscilla Galloway (b. 1930), Canadian children’s book author.
Priscilla Napier (1908-1998), English author and biographer.
Priscilla Uppal (b. 1974), Canadian novelist, playwright, and poet.
Priscilla Wakefield (1751-1832), English activist, children’s book author, and writer.

Cilla

September 9, 2015 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Cecilia”, “Lucille”, “Priscilla“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Cece, Celia, Cila, Cili, Cilke, Cille, Cissy, Luca, Luce, Luci, Lucia, Lucie, Lucja, Lucy, Lula, Lulu, Luus, Luzia, Pris, Prisca, Priska, Prissie, Prissy, Scilla, Sileas, Silja, Silje, Silke, Sile, Sille, Sisi, Sissie, Sissy, Zilla, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Cilla (Priscilla) Lapham, Mrs. Lapham’s devoted, reliable, practical teenaged daughter, who remains a true friend to Johnny through all the turmoil of Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
Cilla McQueen (b. 1949), English poet.

Dusty

September 9, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
A diminutive of “Dustin”, or a nickname given to people who were often dusty or dirty.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
For girls: Dustee, Dusti, Dustie.
For boys: Dustan, Dustie, Dustin, Duston, Dustyn.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Dusty Miller, one of Johnny’s two co-apprentices at Lapham’s silversmithing business, in Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes (written in 1943; set during the years leading up to the American Revolutionary War, 1773-1775).

WRITERS:
Dusty Hughes (b. 1947), English director and playwright.

A Selection of Heel Goed Dutch Baby Names

September 7, 2015 § 1 Comment

If you follow the link, you’ll be able to find out a little bit more about these fantastic Dutch names (although a pronunciation guide is not always included; you may have to look that up yourself!):

20 Dutch Baby Names You’ll Want to Steal Immediately

(Click here to find the French version.)

For girls: Adrie, Anouk, Danique, Evi, Fay / Faye, Lina, Marit, Noa, Tess
For boys: Bas / Bastiaan, Bram, Cas / Casper, Coen / Coenraad, Everhart, Hans, Joost, Lars, Pim, Sander, Schuyler / Skylar

Hig

September 2, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Unknown; possibly a variation of “High” or diminutive of “Higgins” or some such, but really, I’ve no idea.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
. . . I’ve got nothing.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Hig Phillips, a wealthy farmer infamous in the area for hiring a substitute to go to war for him, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

Lafe

September 2, 2015 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Possibly an Anglicization of the Old Norse “Leif”, meaning “heir” or “descendant”, or a diminutive of “Lafayette”, a French last name, meaning “son of Lafay” (“Lafay” being a place name meaning “near the beech tree”).

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Lafay, Lafaye, Lafayette, Lafee, Leif, Leiv.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Lafe Edwards, proprietor of a saloon in Newton, which falls prey to Guy Wortman’s band of troublemakers, in Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt (1964; set during the American Civil War, 1861-1865).

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