Lorinda

August 25, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Variation of “Laura“, meaning “laurel”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Lallie, Lally, Lara, Laraine, Laura, Laure, Laureen, Laurel, Lauren, Laurene, Lauressa, Lauretta, Laurette, Laurey, Laurie, Laurinda, Laurine, Laurissa, Laurita, Laury, Lavra, Llora, Lollie, Lolly, Lora, Loreen, Loren, Lorene, Loretta, Lorette, Lori, Lorie, Lorita, Lorraine, Lorri, Lorrie, Lory, Lowri, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Lorinda, the cook at Windemere, the Erroll’s estate in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

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Orizaba

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Possibly somehow from “Citaltépl”, the Aztec name for the Pico de Orizaba, meaning “star mountain” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ori, Orry, Zabe? Your guess is as good as mine.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Orizaba Page (called “Zabe“), a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Zabe

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
As I’ve seen it used so far, a shortened version of “Orizaba“, possibly from “Citaltépl”, the Aztec name for the Pico de Orizaba, meaning “star mountain” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Well, I probably would have gone with Ori, or Orry, or something, before Zabe, but what do I know?

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Zabe (Orizaba) Page, a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Iztaccihuatl

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From an Aztec myth, meaning “white woman” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Apparently, “Whattle”? Although, personally, I think that’s a dreadful nickname. But let’s be honest, Amélie Rives is a bit problematic as a writer not solely because she is sometimes weird with character names . . .

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Iztaccihuatl Page (called “Whattle“), a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Whattle

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
As I’ve seen it used so far, a shortened version of “Iztaccihuatl“, from an Aztec myth, meaning “white woman”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
I dunno.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Whattle (Iztaccihuatl) Page, a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Popocatepetl

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From an Aztec myth, meaning “smoking mountain” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Well, it seems “Popo” is an option . . .

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Popocatepetl Page (called “Popo“), a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Popo

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
As I’ve seen it used so far, a shortened version of “Popocatepetl“, from an Aztec myth, meaning “smoking mountain”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
. . . No idea. None, maybe.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Popo (Popocatepetl) Page, a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

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