Lorinda

August 25, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Variation of “Laura“, meaning “laurel”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Lallie, Lally, Lara, Laraine, Laura, Laure, Laureen, Laurel, Lauren, Laurene, Lauressa, Lauretta, Laurette, Laurey, Laurie, Laurinda, Laurine, Laurissa, Laurita, Laury, Lavra, Llora, Lollie, Lolly, Lora, Loreen, Loren, Lorene, Loretta, Lorette, Lori, Lorie, Lorita, Lorraine, Lorri, Lorrie, Lory, Lowri, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Lorinda, the cook at Windemere, the Erroll’s estate in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Orizaba

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Possibly somehow from “Citaltépl”, the Aztec name for the Pico de Orizaba, meaning “star mountain” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Ori, Orry, Zabe? Your guess is as good as mine.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Orizaba Page (called “Zabe“), a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Zabe

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
As I’ve seen it used so far, a shortened version of “Orizaba“, possibly from “Citaltépl”, the Aztec name for the Pico de Orizaba, meaning “star mountain” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Well, I probably would have gone with Ori, or Orry, or something, before Zabe, but what do I know?

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Zabe (Orizaba) Page, a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Iztaccihuatl

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From an Aztec myth, meaning “white woman” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Apparently, “Whattle”? Although, personally, I think that’s a dreadful nickname. But let’s be honest, Amélie Rives is a bit problematic as a writer not solely because she is sometimes weird with character names . . .

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Iztaccihuatl Page (called “Whattle“), a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Whattle

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
As I’ve seen it used so far, a shortened version of “Iztaccihuatl“, from an Aztec myth, meaning “white woman”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
I dunno.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Whattle (Iztaccihuatl) Page, a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Popocatepetl

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
From an Aztec myth, meaning “smoking mountain” in the Nauhuatl language.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Well, it seems “Popo” is an option . . .

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Popocatepetl Page (called “Popo“), a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Popo

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
As I’ve seen it used so far, a shortened version of “Popocatepetl“, from an Aztec myth, meaning “smoking mountain”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
. . . No idea. None, maybe.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Popo (Popocatepetl) Page, a young servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Tishy

August 24, 2014 § Leave a comment

ORIGIN:
Diminutive of “Letitia” / “Latisha”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Laetitia, Latisha, Latitia, Latisha, Latizia, Leta, Leticia, Letisha, Letitia, Letizia, Lettice, Lettie, Letty, Lecia, Licia, Ticia, Tish, Tisha, Tishie, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Tishy, an old servant at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

Virginia

August 24, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Feminine version of a Roman family name, meaning “maid” or “virgin”.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Geena, Gena, Gigi, Gina, Ginia, Ginger, Ginnie, Ginny, Jeana, Jeanna, Jinnie, Jinny, Virgee, Virgie, Virgy, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
Virginia Herrick, the lovely daughter of the overseer of Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.

WRITERS:
– Virginia C. (V.C.) Andrews (1923-1986), pen name of American novelist Cleo Virginia Andrews.
– Virginia Clay-Copton (1825-1915), American memoirist and socialite.
– Virginia Hamilton (1934-2002), American children’s book writer.
– Virginia Henley (b. 1935), English novelist.
– Virginia Rudd Lanier (1930-2003), American mystery writer.
– Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), English writer and modernist.

Milly

August 16, 2014 § 1 Comment

ORIGIN:
Alternate spelling of “Millie“, a diminutive of “Mildred”, “Millicent”, “Emilie” / “Emily“, “Camille”, “Amelia“, etc.

VARIATIONS and NICKNAMES:
Mila, Mili, Milla, Milli, Millie, etc.

REFERENCES IN LITERATURE:
– Milly, one of the servants at Caryston Hall, in Virginia of Virginia, written by Amélie Rives in 1888.
– Milly Rogers, a snobbish girl the Dunbar’s fear will look down on them for their plans to make and sell doll clothes, in “The Little Dunbars, and Their Charming Christmas Plans”, from The Youngest Miss Lorton, and Other Stories by Nora Perry (1889).

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